Etymology
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indecent (adj.)
1560s, "unbecoming, in bad taste," from French indécent (14c.) or directly from Latin indecentem (nominative indecens) "unbecoming, unseemly," from in- "not, opposite of, without" (see in- (1)) + decens "becoming, seemly, fitting, proper," present participle of decere "to be fitting or suitable," from PIE *deke-, from root *dek- "to take, accept." Sense of "offending against propriety" is from 1610s. Indecent assault (1861) originally covered sexual assaults other than rape or intended rape, but by 1934 it was being used as a euphemism for "rape." Related: Indecently
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indecency (n.)
1580s, "outrageous conduct," from Latin indecentia "unseemliness, impropriety," abstract noun from indecentem "unbecoming" (see indecent). Now especially of conduct which violates recognized standards of propriety (1690s).
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smutty (adj.)
1590s, "soiled with smut" (of grain); 1660s, "indecent," from smut + -y (2). Related: Smuttily; smuttiness. Smutty-nosed in ornithology means "having black nostrils."
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uncomely (adj.)
c. 1200, "improper, unseemly, indecent," from un- (1) "not" + comely. Related: Uncomeliness.
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exposure (n.)
c. 1600, "public exhibition," from expose (v.) + -ure. Sense of "situation with regard to sun or weather" is from 1660s. Photographic sense "act of exposing to light" is from 1839. Indecent exposure attested by 1825.
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suggestive (adj.)
1630s, "conveying a hint," from suggest + -ive. From 1888 specifically as a faintly euphemistic reference to proposals of indecent behavior. Related: Suggestively; suggestiveness.
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unseemly (adj.)

c. 1300, "visually unpleasing, unattractive, ugly;" mid-14c., "unfitting, indecent, inappropriate," from un- (1) "not" + seemly (adj.). Similar formation in Old Norse usoemiligr. Related: Unseemliness.

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flashing (n.)
1791, "act of creating an artificial flood," verbal noun from flash (v.); also compare flash (n.2)). Meaning "indecent exposure" is by 1968 (see flasher). The meaning "strip of metal used in roofing, etc." is from 1782, earlier simply flash (1570s), but the sense connection is unclear and it might be an unrelated word.
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immodest (adj.)
1560s, "arrogant, impudent, not modest about one's pretentions," from Latin immodestus "unrestrained, excessive," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + modestus "moderate, keeping due measure, sober, gentle, temperate," from modus "measure, manner" (from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures"). Meaning "indecent, lewd, not modest in person or utterance" is from 1580s. Related: immodestly.
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smut (n.)
1660s, "black mark, stain," from verb smutten "debase, defile" (late 14c.), later "stain or mark with soot, etc." (1580s), cognate with Middle High German smotzen "make dirty," from West Germanic *smutt- (source also of Middle High German smuz "grease, dirt;" German Schmutz "dirt," schmutzen "to make dirty"). The meaning "indecent or obscene language" is first attested 1660s.
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