Etymology
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increment (n.)
mid-15c., "act or process of increasing," from Latin incrementum "growth, increase; an addition," from stem of increscere "to grow in or upon" (see increase (v.)). Meaning "amount of increase" first attested 1630s.
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incremental (adj.)
1715, from increment + -al (1). Related: Incrementally.
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additament (n.)
c. 1400, "anything added, an increase or increment," from Latin additamentum "an increase," from past participle stem of addere "to add" (see add).
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accrue (v.)
Origin and meaning of accrue
formerly also accrew, mid-15c., "to fall to someone as an addition or increment," of property, etc., from Old French acreue "growth, increase, what has grown," fem. of acreu, past participle of acreistre (Modern French accroître) "to increase," from Latin accrescere "grow progressively, increase, become greater," from ad "to" (see ad-) + crescere "grow" (from PIE root *ker- (2) "to grow"). Related: Accrued; accruing.

Apparently an English verb from a French noun because there is no English noun to go with it until much later (the earliest seems to be now-obsolete accrue, 1570s), unless the record is defective. From late 15c. as "happen or result as a natural growth;" from 1881 as "gain by increment, accumulate." Alternative verb accrete "grow by adhesion" (1784) is rare, as is accresce (1630s), from Latin accrescere.
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