Etymology
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aggravated (adj.)
1540s, "increased, magnified," past-participle adjective from aggravate. Meaning "irritated" is from 1610s; that of "made worse" is from 1630s. The earlier adjective was simply aggravate "threatened" (late 15c.), from the Latin past participle.
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gigantism (n.)
medical condition causing abnormal increased size, 1854, from Latin gigant- "giant" (see gigantic) + -ism.
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grown (adj.)
late 14c., "increased in growth," past-participle adjective from grow (v.). Meaning "arrived at full growth, mature" is from 1640s.
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mouth-watering (adj.)

"enticing," literally "causing an increased flow of saliva in the mouth" (as at the mere sight of food by one who is hungry), 1822, from mouth (n.) + water (v.).

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augmented (adj.)
c. 1600, "increased," past-participle adjective from augment. Musical sense of "greater by a semitone than a perfect or major interval" (opposite of diminished) is attested by 1825.
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cumulate (v.)

1530s, "gather into a heap or mass" (transitive), from Latin cumulatus "heaped, increased, augmented," past participle of cumulare "to heap," from cumulus "mound, heap" (from suffixed form of PIE root *keue- "to swell"). Related: Cumulated; cumulating; cumulant.

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august (adj.)
"inspiring reverence and admiration, solemnly grand," 1660s, from Latin augustus "venerable, majestic, magnificent, noble," perhaps originally "consecrated by the augurs, with favorable auguries" (see augur (n.)); or else [de Vaan] "that which is increased" (see augment).
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augmentation (n.)

mid-15c., "act of making greater," from Old French augmentacion "increase," from Late Latin augmentationem (nominative augmentatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of augmentare "to increase" (see augment). Meaning "amount by which something is increased" is from 1520s. Musical sense is from 1590s, in fugues.

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augmentative (adj.)

"having power or quality of augmenting," c. 1500, from Old French augmentatif (14c.), from Late Latin augmentat-, stem of augmentare "to increase" (see augment). In grammar, "expressing augmentation or increase in the force of the idea conveyed," from 1640s. It is applied both to words and to affixes; also as a noun in grammar, "word formed to express increased intensity of the idea conveyed by it, or an affix which serves this purpose."

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freshet (n.)
1590s, "stream of fresh water; stream flowing into the sea," from obsolete fresh (n.) "a stream in flood" (1530s), also "mingling of fresh and salt water," from fresh (adj.1). Old English had fersceta in the same sense. Meaning "small flood or increased flow of an ebb tide caused by rain or melting snow" is from 1650s.
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