Etymology
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inconvenient (adj.)

late 14c., "injurious, dangerous," also "absurd, illogical" (senses now obsolete), from Latin inconvenientem (nominative inconveniens) "unsuitable, not accordant, dissimilar," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + convenientem (see convenient). In early 15c., "inappropriate, unbecoming, unnatural;" also, of an accused person, "unlikely as a culprit, innocent." Sense of "troublesome, incommodious, awkward" is recorded from 1650s.

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inconveniently (adv.)

mid-15c., inconvenientli, "wrongfully," from inconvenient + -ly (2). Meaning "with trouble or discomfort" is from 1650s.

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inconvenience (n.)
c. 1400, "harm, damage; danger; misfortune, affliction," from Old French inconvenience "misfortune, calamity; impropriety" (Modern French inconvenance), from Late Latin inconvenientia "lack of consistency, incongruity" (in Medieval Latin "misfortune, affliction"), abstract noun from inconvenientem (see inconvenient). Sense of "impropriety, unfitness; an improper act or utterance" in English is from early 15c. Meaning "quality of being inconvenient" is from 1650s.
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cumbersome (adj.)

late 14c., "burdensome, troublesome," from cumber (v.) + -some (1). Meaning "unwieldy, inconvenient, hard to carry" is from 1590s. Cumberless "free from care or encumbrance" (1580s) is rare. Related: Cumbersomely; cumbersomeness.

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incommodious (adj.)
1550s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + commodious. Related: Incommodiously. A verb, incommode, is attested from late 16c., from Latin incommodare. The Latin adjective was incommodus "inconvenient."
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inconveniency (n.)
early 15c., "calamity, injury, harmful consequence," also "danger" (now obsolete), from Late Latin inconvenientia (see inconvenience (n.)). Meaning "trouble, disadvantage, quality of being inconvenient" is from 1550s.
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incommodity (n.)
early 15c., from Old French incommodité (14c.), from Latin incommoditas "inconvenience, disadvantage; damage, injury," from incommodus "inconvenient, unsuitable, troublesome," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + commodus "suitable, convenient" (see commode).
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inopportune (adj.)

"inconvenient, unseasonable, unsuitable, inappropriate, unfit," 1530s, from Late Latin inopportunus "unfitting," from in- "not" (from PIE root *ne- "not") + opportunus "favorable, convenient" (see opportune). Rare or obsolete in 18c. Related: Inopportunely; inopportuneness; inopportunity.

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white elephant (n.)
"burdensome charge, inconvenient thing that one does not know how to get rid of," 1851, supposedly from the practice of the King of Siam of presenting one of the sacred albino elephants to a courtier who had fallen from favor; the gift was a great honor, but the proper upkeep of one was ruinously expensive.
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heinous (adj.)
late 14c., "hateful, odious, atrocious," from Old French hainos "inconvenient, awkward; hateful, unpleasant; odious" (12c., Modern French haineux), from haine "hatred, hate," from hair "to hate," from Frankish, from Proto-Germanic *hatjan, from PIE *kad- "sorrow, hatred" (see hate (v.)). Related: Heinously; heinousness.
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