Etymology
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inconsiderate (adj.)
late 15c., "done thoughtlessly, heedless, careless, indiscreet," from Latin inconsideratus "headstrong, unadvised," of persons, "thoughtless," literally "not properly considered," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + consideratus (see consider). Sense of "without regard for the feelings of others" is from 1842. Related: Inconsiderately.
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inconsiderateness (n.)
1590s, "imprudence," from inconsiderate + -ness. From 1858 as "want of consideration for others."
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inconsideration (n.)
1520s, "indiscretion, rashness, failure to consider," from Late Latin inconsiderationem (nominative inconsideratio) "inconsiderateness," from Latin inconsideratus "headstrong, thoughtless" (see inconsiderate).
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thoughtless (adj.)
1610s, "heedless, imprudent," from thought + -less. Meaning "inconsiderate of others" is from 1794. Related: Thoughtlessly; thoughtlessness.
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imprudence (n.)
early 15c., "quality of rashness or heedlessness; imprudent act," from Old French imprudence (14c.) or directly from Latin imprudentia "lack of foresight, inconsiderateness, ignorance, inadvertence," abstract noun from imprudens "unaware, inconsiderate" (see imprudent).
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imprudent (adj.)
late 14c., from Latin imprudentem (nominative imprudens) "not foreseeing, unaware, inconsiderate, heedless," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + prudens, contraction of providens, present participle of providere "to provide," literally "to see before (one)" (see provide). Related: Imprudently.
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push (n.)

1560s, "a driving or impelling thrust," from push (v.). By 1590s as "a vigorous attempt." By 1803 as "a determined advance, a pushing forward." The sense of "persevering enterprise, a determined effort to get on" especially if inconsiderate of others is by 1855. Phrase when push comes to shove "when action must back up threats" is by 1936. An earlier Middle English noun push "a pustule, pimple, boil" probably is from pus by influence of push.

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