Etymology
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incongruous (adj.)
1610s, from Latin incongruus "incongruous, inconsistent," from in- "not, opposite of, without" (see in- (1)) + congruus "fit, suitable" (see congruent). Related: Incongruously; incongruousness.
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incongruence (n.)
c. 1600, from Late Latin incongruentia "incongruity," from incongruentem (nominative incongruens) "incongruous, inconsistent," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + congruens (see congruent). Related: Incongruency.
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absurdity (n.)

late 15c., absurdite, "that which is absurd," from Late Latin absurditatem (nominative absurditas) "dissonance, incongruity," noun of state from Latin absurdus "out of tune;" figuratively "incongruous, silly, senseless" (see absurd).

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abhorrent (adj.)
Origin and meaning of abhorrent
1610s, "recoiling (from), strongly opposed to," from Latin abhorentem (nominative abhorrens) "incongruous, inappropriate," present participle of abhorrere "shrink back from, be remote from, be out of harmony with" (see abhor). Meaning "repugnant, loathesome" is from 1650s. Earlier was abhorrable (late 15c.).
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conglomerate (n.)

1809, in geology, "a rock made up of pebbles and other water-worn debris from previous rocks," from conglomerate (adj.). General sense of "anything comprised of heterogeneous or incongruous materials" is from 1831.  Specific sense "large business group" is from 1963, short for conglomerate corporation. Related: Conglomeratic.

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necrotomy (n.)

"dissection of dead bodies," 1821; see necro- "corpse" -tomy "a cutting."

Necrotomy. We venture to employ this word in the room of post mortem appearances, and other incongruous expressions which deform our medical style. It is constructed on principles strictly analogous to those of the English language and ... is equivalent to the Latin sectio cadaveris, and literally signifies the dissection of a dead body; which is more appropriate than autopsia, which only signifies inspecting, viewing, contemplating by one's self. [M. Vaidy, in "The Medico-Chirurgical Review," June 1821, translated footnote]
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absurd (adj.)
Origin and meaning of absurd

"plainly illogical," 1550s, from French absurde (16c.), from Latin absurdus "out of tune, discordant;" figuratively "incongruous, foolish, silly, senseless," from ab- "off, away from," here perhaps an intensive prefix, + surdus "dull, deaf, mute," which is possibly from an imitative PIE root meaning "to buzz, whisper" (see susurration). Thus the basic sense is perhaps "out of tune," but de Vaan writes, "Since 'deaf' often has two semantic sides, viz. 'who cannot hear' and 'who is not heard,' ab-surdus can be explained as 'which is unheard of' ..." The modern English sense is the Latin figurative one, perhaps "out of harmony with reason or propriety." Related: Absurdly; absurdness.

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bigot (n.)
1590s, "sanctimonious person, religious hypocrite," from French bigot (12c.), which is of unknown origin. Sense extended 1680s to other than religious opinions.

Earliest French use of the word is as the name of a people apparently in southern Gaul, which led to the theory, now considered doubtful on phonetic grounds, that the word comes from Visigothus. The typical use in Old French seems to have been as a derogatory nickname for Normans, leading to another theory (not universally accepted) that traces it to the Normans' (alleged) frequent use of the Germanic oath bi God. OED dismisses in a three-exclamation-mark fury one fanciful version of the "by god" theory as "absurdly incongruous with facts." At the end, not much is left standing except Spanish bigote "mustache," which also has been proposed as the origin of the word, but not explained, so the chief virtue of that theory is the lack of evidence for or against it.

In support of the "by God" theory the surnames Bigott, Bygott are attested in Normandy and in England from the 11c., and French name-etymology sources (such as Dauzat) explain it as a derogatory name applied by the French to the Normans and representing "by god." The English were known as goddamns 200 years later in Joan of Arc's France, and during World War I Americans serving in France were said to be known as les sommobiches (see son of a bitch) for their characteristic oaths. But the sense development in bigot would be difficult to explain. According to Donkin, the modern use first appears in French in 16c. This and the earliest English sense, "religious hypocrite," especially a female one, might have been influenced by or confused with beguine (q.v.) and the words that cluster around it.
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