Etymology
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incomparable (adj.)
early 15c., from Old French incomparable (12c.) or directly from Latin incomparabilis "that cannot be equaled," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + comparabilis "comparable" (see comparable). Related: Incomparably.
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incomparability (n.)
c. 1500, incomparablete, "quality of being peerless," from incomparable + -ity.
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uncomparable (adj.)
late 14c., "incomparable," from un- (1) "not" + comparable. Meaning "unable to be compared (to something else)" is from 1826. Related: Uncomparably.
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Fuji 
mountain in Japan, also Fujiyama (with Japanese yama "mountain"), of unknown origin. Some of the senses that have been suggested are "prosperous man," "fire-spitter," "incomparable," and "beauty of the long slope hanging in the sky."
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fop (n.)

mid-15c., "foolish person," of unknown origin, perhaps related to obsolete verb fop "make a fool of," from a continental source akin to German foppen "jeer at, make a fool of." Sense of "dandy, coxcomb, man ostentatiously nice in manner and appearance" is from 1670s, perhaps given in derision by those who thought such things foolish. The 18c. was their period of greatest florescense. The junior variety was a fopling (1680s).

His was the sumptuous age of powder and patches. He was especially dainty in the matters of sword-knots, shoe-buckles, and lace ruffles. He was ablaze with jewelry, took snuff with an incomparable air out of a box studded with diamonds, and excelled in the "nice conduct of a clouded cane." [Charles J. Dunphie, "Fops and Foppery," New York, 1876]
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