Etymology
Advertisement
income (n.)
c. 1300, "entrance, arrival," literally "a coming in;" see in (adv.) + come (v.). Perhaps a noun use of the late Old English verb incuman "come in, enter." Meaning "money made through business or labor" (i.e., "that which 'comes in' as payment for work or business") first recorded c. 1600. Compare German einkommen "income," Swedish inkomst. Income tax is from 1790, introduced in Britain during the Napoleonic wars, re-introduced 1842; in U.S. levied by the federal government 1861-72, authorized on a national level in 1913.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
rentier (n.)

"one who has a fixed income from investment" (in land, stocks, etc.), 1847, from French rentier, "holder of rental properties or investments that pay income," from rente "profit, income" (see rent (n.1), the old, broader sense of which survives in this).

Related entries & more 
revenue (n.)

early 15c., "income from property or possessions," from Old French revenue "a return," noun use of fem. past participle of revenir "come back" (10c.), from Latin revenire "return, come back," from re- "back" (see re-) + venire "to come" (from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come").

The meaning "public income, annual income of a government or state" is recorded from 1680s; revenue sharing was popularized from 1971, the Nixon Administration's policy of returning power to state and local governments by steering federal taxpayer money to them. Revenuer "U.S. Department of Revenue agent," the bane of Appalachian moonshiners, is attested by 1880.

Related entries & more 
expense (v.)

"offset (an expenditure) against an income," 1909, from expense (n.). Related: Expensed; expensing.

Related entries & more 
DINK 
acronym for double income, no kids, popular from 1987.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
unearned (adj.)
c. 1200, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of earn (v.). Unearned income is recorded from 1889.
Related entries & more 
shelter (v.)
1580s, "to screen, protect," from shelter (n.); in the income investment sense, from 1955. Meaning "to take shelter" is from c. 1600. Related: Sheltered; sheltering.
Related entries & more 
fixed (adj.)
late 14c., of stars, "unchangeable in position," past-participle adjective from fix (v.). Related: fixedly (1590s). Fixed-income (n.) is from 1767.
Related entries & more 
endow (v.)
late 14c., indowen "provide an income for," from Anglo-French endover, from en- "in" (see en- (1)) + Old French douer "endow," from Latin dotare "to endow, bestow, portion," from dos (genitive dotis) "marriage portion," from PIE *do-ti, from root *do- "to give." Related: Endowed; endowing.
Related entries & more 
Mercedes 

fem. proper name, from Spanish, abbreviation of Maria de las Mercedes "Mary of the Mercies," from plural of merced "mercy, grace," from Latin mercedem (nominative merces) "hire, pay, wage, salary; rent, income; a price for anything;" see mercy. The early Christians gave a spiritual meaning to the purely financial classical senses of the Latin word, which also, in its original senses, entered Middle English as mercede "wages" (late 14c.).

Related entries & more