Etymology
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include (v.)
early 15c., "to shut (someone or something) in materially, enclose, imprison, confine," also "to have (something) as a constituent part," from Latin includere "to shut in, enclose, imprison, insert," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + claudere "to shut" (see close (v.)). The alleged Sam Goldwyn-ism "Include me out" is attested from 1937. Related: Included; including.
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inclusive (adv.)
"including the stated limits in the number or sum," mid-15c., from Medieval Latin inclusivus, from Latin inclus-, past participle stem of includere "to shut in, enclose" (see include).
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inclusion (n.)

c. 1600, "act of making a part of," from Latin inclusionem (nominative inclusio) "a shutting up, confinement," noun of action from past-participle stem of includere (see include). Meaning "that which is included" is from 1839.

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budget (v.)
"to include in a (fiscal) budget," 1884, from budget (n.). Related: Budgeted; budgeting.
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schedule (v.)

1855, "make a schedule of;" 1862, "include in a schedule;" from schedule (n.). Related: Scheduled; scheduling.

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alienage (n.)
"state of being alien," 1753, from alien (adj.) + -age. Other abstract noun forms include alienship (1846); alienness (1881).
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princeling (n.)

1610s, "young or little prince;" 1794, "petty or inferior prince," from prince + -ling. Other terms for the same things include princekin (1855, Thackeray), princelet (1680s).

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academia (n.)
"the academic community, the world of colleges and universities," 1956, Modern Latin, from Academe (q.v.). Related modern coinages include academize (1966); academese (1937).
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chatterbox (n.)

"incessant talker," 1774, from chatter (n.) + box (n.1). Compare saucebox. Other old terms for the same thing include prattle-basket (c. 1600), prate-apace (1630s).

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shammy (n.)

1650s, phonological spelling of chamois. Other bungled spellings include shambo (1610s), shamois, shamoys, shammies. Compare shay from chaise; shappo (1700) for chapeau; shapperoon (1620s) for chaperon.

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