Etymology
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inchoate (adj.)
"recently or just begun," 1530s, from Latin inchoatus, past participle of inchoare, alteration of incohare "commence, begin," probably originally "to hitch up," traditionally derived from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + a verb from cohum "strap (fastened to the oxen's yoke)," a word of obscure origin. De Vaan says that as, incohere "is a frequent verb, ... its meaning can easily have derived from 'to yoke a plough to a team of oxen' ..., in other words, 'to start work.' Thus, there might be a core of truth in the ancient connection of cohum with a yoke."
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inchoative (adj.)
1630s, "indicating beginning or inception;" see inchoate + -ive. Especially in grammar, of verbs, "denoting the beginning of action, inceptive," 1660s.
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choate (adj.)
"finished, complete," mistaken back-formation from inchoate (q.v.) as though that word contained in- "not." First attested 1878 in letter from Oliver Wendell Holmes lamenting barbarisms in legal case writing (he said he found choate in a California report).
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embryonic (adj.)

1819, "having the character or being in the condition of an embryo; pertaining or relating to an embryo or embryos," from medical Latin embryonem (see embryo) + -ic. Figurative use, "rudimentary, incomplete, inchoate" is from 1856. Earlier adjectives were embryonal (1650s), embryonate (1690s). Related: Embryonically.

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