Etymology
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inarticulate (adj.)
c. 1600, "not clear or intelligible" (of speech); "not jointed or hinged, not composed of segments connected by joints" (in biology), from Late Latin inarticulatus "not articulate, not distinct," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + articulatus, past participle of articulare "to separate into joints; to utter distinctly" (see articulation). Of persons, "not able to speak clearly," 1754. Related: Inarticulately; inarticulateness; inarticulable.
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uh 

inarticulate sound, attested from c. 1600; uh-huh, spoken affirmative (often ironic or non-committal) is recorded by 1894; negative uh-uh is attested from 1924.

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gibberish (n.)
"rapid and inarticulate speech; talk in no known language," 1550s, imitative of the sound of chatter, probably influenced by jabber. Used early 17c. of the language of rogues and gypsies.
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stridulous (adj.)
1610s, from Latin stridulus "giving a shrill sound, creaking," from stridere "to utter an inarticulate sound, grate, creak" (see strident). Stridulation is from 1831. Stridulate (v.) first recorded 1838. Related: Stridulated; stridulating; stridulously; stridulousness.
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bump (n.)
1590s, "protuberance caused by a blow;" 1610s as "a dull-sounding, solid blow;" see bump (v.). The dancer's bump and grind attested from 1940. To be like a bump on a log "silent, stupidly inarticulate" is by 1863, American English.
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babble (n.)
c. 1500, "idle talk," from babble (v.). In 16c., commonly in reduplicated form bibble-babble (1530s). Meaning "inarticulate speech" is from 1660s. Other nouns meaning "idle talk" included babblery (1530s), babblement (1640s).
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strident (adj.)
1650s, from French strident (16c.) and directly from Latin stridentem (nominative stridens), present participle of stridere "utter an inarticulate sound, grate, screech," from PIE *(s)trei-, possibly of imitative origin (source also of Greek trismos "a grinding, scream"). Related: Stridently; stridence; stridency.
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mumble (v.)

early 14c., momelen, "to eat in a slow, ineffective manner" (perhaps "to talk with one's mouth full"), probably frequentative of the interjection mum. The -b- is from 15c., unetymological. Meaning "to speak indistinctly in low tones" is from mid-14c. Transitive sense of "to utter in a low, inarticulate voice" is from mid-15c. Related: Mumbled; mumbler; mumbling.

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mum (interj.)

"be silent," 1560s, from a verb mum (Middle English mommen) "make silent" (c. 1400); "be silent" (mid-15c.), from mum, mom (late 14c.), "an inarticulate closed-mouth sound" indicative of unwillingness or inability to speak, probably imitative. As an adjective meaning "secret" or "silent" from 1520s. Phrase mum's the word is recorded by 1704.

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moan (n.)

c. 1200, mon, "lamentation, mourning, weeping; complaining, the expressing of complaints; a complaint; lover's complaint; accusation, charge," perhaps from an unrecorded Old English *mān "complaint," from mānan, a variant of mænan "complain, moan," also "tell, intend, signify" (see mean (v.1)); but OED discounts this connection. Meaning "long, low inarticulate murmur expressing grief or pain" is by 1670s, "with onomatopoeic suggestion" [OED].

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