Etymology
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in situ 
1740, Latin, literally "in its (original) place or position," from ablative of situs "site" (see site (n.)).
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in toto (adv.)
Latin, "as a whole, wholly, completely, utterly, entirely," from toto, ablative of totus "whole, entire" (see total (adj.)); "always or nearly always with verbs of negative sense" [Fowler].
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in fieri 
legal Latin, "in the process of being done," from fieri "to come into being, become," used as passive of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").
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in vivo 
1898, Latin; "within a living organism," from vivere "to live" (see vital).
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in extremis 
"at the point of death," 16c., Latin, literally "in the farthest reaches," from ablative plural of extremus "extreme" (see extreme (adj.)).
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log in (v.)
verbal phrase, 1963 in the computing sense, from log (v.2) + in (adv.).
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in re (prep.)

"in the matter of, in the (legal) case of," c. 1600, probably from Duns Scotus; Latin, from re, ablative of res "property, goods; matter, thing, affair," from Proto-Italic *re-, from PIE *reh-i- "wealth, goods" (source also of Sanskrit rayi- "property, goods," Avestan raii-i- "wealth").

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in utero 
1713, Latin, literally "in the uterus," from ablative of uterus (see uterus).
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in memoriam 

Latin, literally "in memory of," from accusative of memoria "memory" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember"). The phrase was much-used in Latin writing; Tennyson's poem of that name (published in 1850) seems to have introduced the phrase to English.

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in absentia (adv.)
Latin, literally "in (his/her/their) absence" (see absence). By 1831 in English, earlier in legal Latin.
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