Etymology
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impudent (adj.)
late 14c., from Latin impudentem (nominative impudens) "without shame, shameless," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + pudens "ashamed, modest," present-participle adjective from pudere "to cause shame" (see pudendum). Related: Impudently.
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impudence (n.)
late 14c., from Latin impudentia "shamelessness," abstract noun from impudens "shameless" (see impudent).
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sassy (adj.)

"outspoken, impudent, cheeky," 1833, American English, alteration of saucy. Related: Sassily; sassiness.

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malapert (adj.)

late 14c., "impudent, shameless, presumptuous," from Old French mal apert "over-ready, impudent," literally "ill-skilled," from mal "badly" (see mal-) + apert "skillful," variant of espert "experienced, skillful, clever" (from Latin expertus; see expert (adj.)). Attested from c. 1300 as the name of the personification of impudence. From mid-15c. as an adverb, "impudently, presumptuously." Related: Malapertly; malapertness.

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cheeky (adj.)

"impudent, presumptuous," 1859 (1850 as the nickname of a misbehaving boy in a story), from cheek in its sense of "insolence" + -y (2). Related: Cheekily; cheekiness (1841). 

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jezebel (n.)
"impudent woman," 1550s, after Jezebel, the wicked Tyrean princess who married Ahab, king of Israel (I Kings xxi), from Hebrew Izebhel, "a name of uncertain origin and meaning" [Klein].
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headstrong (adj.)
"determined to have one's way," late 14c., from head (n.) + strong. Compare Old English heafodbald "impudent," literally "head-bold." Strongheaded is attested from c. 1600.
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freak (n.2)
"brave man, warrior," Scottish freik, from Middle English freke "a bold man, a warrior, a man," from Old English freca "bold man, a warrior," from frec "greedy, eager, bold" (compare German frech "bold, impudent").
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snotty (adj.)
1560s, "full of snot," from snot + -y (2). Meaning "impudent, curt, conceited" is from 1870. Related: Snottily; snottiness. Snotnose "upstart" is from 1941; snotty-nose "contemptible fellow" is from c. 1600.
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nervy (adj.)

c. 1600, "vigorous, sinewy, strong," from nerve (n.) + -y (2). By 1870 as "full of courage or fortitude;" by 1891 as "excitable;" by 1896 as "coolly impudent." Related: Nerviness.

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