Etymology
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implant (v.)

1540s, "to plant in" (abstractly, of ideas, emotions, etc.), from French implanter "to insert, engraft" (alongside Old French emplanter "to plant"), literally "plant in," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + planter "to plant" (see plant (n.)). Meaning "surgically implant (something) in the body" is from 1886, originally of teeth. Implanted is attested earlier, from early 15c., probably based on Medieval Latin implantus. Related: Implanting.

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implant (n.)
1890, "thing implanted;" 1941 as "action of implanting," from implant (v.). Related: Implants, which is attested by 1981 as short for breast implants (1976).
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implantation (n.)
1570s, "manner of being implanted," from French implantation, noun of action from implanter "to insert, engraft" (see implant (v.)). From c. 1600 as "act of implanting;" in embryology from 1902.
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*plat- 

also *pletə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to spread;" extension of root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread."

It forms all or part of: clan; flan; flat (adj.) "without curvature or projection;" flat (n.) "a story of a house;" flatter (v.); flounder (n.) "flatfish;" implant; piazza; place; plaice; plane; (n.4) type of tree; plant; plantain (n.2); plantar; plantation; plantigrade; plat; plate; plateau; platen; platform; platinum; platitude; Platonic; Plattdeutsch; platter; platypus; plaza; supplant; transplant.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit prathati "spreads out;" Hittite palhi "broad;" Greek platys "broad, flat;" Latin planta "sole of the foot;" Lithuanian platus "broad;" German Fladen "flat cake;" Old Norse flatr "flat;" Old English flet "floor, dwelling;" Old Irish lethan "broad."

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inoculate (v.)
mid-15c., "implant a bud into a plant," from Latin inoculatus, past participle of inoculare "graft in, implant a bud or eye of one plant into another," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + oculus "bud," originally "eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see"). Meaning "implant germs of a disease to produce immunity" is from inoculation, originally in reference to smallpox, after 1799, often used in sense of "to inoculate with a vaccine." Related: Inoculated; inoculating.
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im- 
variant of in- before -b-, -m-, -p- in the sense of "not, opposite of" (immobile, impersonal; see in- (2)) as well as "in, into" (implant, impoverish; see in- (1)). In some English words it alternates with em- (1).
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insertion (n.)
1590s, "act of putting in," from French insertion (16c.) or directly from Late Latin insertionem (nominative insertio) "a putting in," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin inserere "to graft, implant" (see insert (v.)). Meaning "that which is inserted" attested from 1620s.
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insert (v.)

"to set in, put or place in," 1520s, from Latin insertus, past participle of inserere "to graft, implant," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + serere "join together, arrange, put in a row," from PIE root *ser- (2) "to line up." Middle English had inseren "to set in place, to graft, to introduce (into the mind)" (late 14c.), directly from the Latin verb. Related: Inserted; inserting.

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lodge (v.)
c. 1200, loggen, "to encamp (an army), set up camp;" c. 1300 "furnish with a temporary habitation, put in a certain place," from Old French logier "to lodge; find lodging for" (12c., Modern French loger), from loge "hut, cabin" (see lodge (n.)).

From late 14c. as "to dwell, live; to have temporary accommodations; to provide (someone) with sleeping quarters; to get lodgings." Sense of "plant, implant, get (a spear, bullet, fist, etc.) in the intended place, to make something stick" is from 1610s. Meaning "deposit" (a complaint, etc.) with an official" is from 1708. Related: Lodged; lodging.
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engender (v.)
early 14c., "beget, procreate," from Old French engendrer (12c.) "give birth to, beget, bear; cause, bring about," from Latin ingenerare "to implant, engender, produce," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + generare "bring forth, beget, produce," from genus "race, kind" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups). With euphonious -d- in French. Also from early 14c. engendered was used in a theological sense, with reference to Jesus, "derived (from God)." Meaning "cause, produce" is mid-14c. Related: Engendering.
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