Etymology
Advertisement
imperative (adj.)

1520s, in grammar, "expressing command," used of the form of a verb which expresses command, entreaty, advice, or exhortation, from Late Latin imperativus "pertaining to a command," from imperat-, past participle stem of imperare "to command, requisition," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + parare "to arrange, prepare, adorn" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
imperative (n.)
mid-15c., in grammar; later "something imperative" (c. 1600), from Old French imperatif in the grammatical sense (13c.) and directly from Late Latin imperativus (see imperative (adj.)). In philosophy from 1796.
Related entries & more 
imperator (n.)
"absolute ruler," 1580s, from Latin imperator "commander-in-chief, leader, master," agent noun from stem of imperare "to command" (see imperative (adj.)). In the Roman republic, a holder of military command during active service, also a title bestowed on victorious generals; in the Roman Empire, the emperor as commander-in-chief of the armies. Related: Imperatorial.
Related entries & more 
vid. 
abbreviation of vide, Latin imperative singular of videre "to see" (see vision).
Related entries & more 
vade 
Latin, imperative singular of vadere "to go" (see vamoose).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
begone (interj.)
"go away! depart!" late 14c., contracted from imperative verbal phrase be gone!; see be + gone.
Related entries & more 
vide 
"see," Latin imperative singular of videre "to see" (from PIE root *weid- "to see").
Related entries & more 
cf. 

abbreviation of Latin confer "compare," imperative of conferre (see confer).

Related entries & more 
tace 
"be silent!" Latin imperative of tacere "to be silent" (see tacit).
Related entries & more 
Shema 
from Hebrew shema "hear!," imperative of shama "to hear." First word of Deuteronomy vi.4.
Related entries & more