Etymology
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immortal (adj.)
late 14c., "deathless," from Latin immortalis "deathless, undying" (of gods), "imperishable, endless" (of fame, love, work, etc.), from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + mortalis "mortal" (from PIE root *mer- "to rub away, harm," also "to die" and forming words referring to death and to beings subject to death). In reference to fame, literature, etc., "unceasing, destined to endure forever, never to be forgotten, lasting a long time," attested from early 15c. (also in classical Latin). As a noun, "an immortal being," from 1680s.
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immortality (n.)
mid-14c., "deathlessness," from Old French immortalité (13c.) and directly from Latin immortalitatem (nominative immortalitas) "deathlessness, endless life," also "imperishable fame," from immortalis "undying" (see immortal). Of fame, etc., "quality of being permanent," early 15c.
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immortalize (v.)

1560s, "bestow lasting fame upon, exempt from oblivion," from immortal + -ize. Perhaps modeled on French immortaliser. The literal sense "endow with immortality" is from 1630s in English. Related: Immortalized; immortalizing.

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immortelle (n.)
"flower which preserves its shape and color after being dried" (also known as an everlasting), 1832, from French fem. of immortel "undying," from Latin immortalis (see immortal).
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*mer- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to rub away, harm." Possibly identical with the root *mer- that means "to die" and forms words referring to death and to beings subject to death.

It forms all or part of: amaranth; ambrosia; amortize; Amritsar; immortal; manticore; marasmus; mare (n.3) "night-goblin, incubus;" morbid; mordacious; mordant; moribund; morsel; mort (n.2) "note sounded on a horn at the death of the quarry;" mortal; mortality; mortar; mortgage; mortify; mortmain; mortuary; murder; murrain; nightmare; post-mortem; remorse.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit mrnati "crushes, bruises," mriyate "to kill," martave "to die," mrta- "died, dead," mrtih "death," martah "mortal man," amrta- "immortal;" Avestan miriia- "to die," miryeite "dies," Old Persian martiya- "man;" Hittite mer- "to disappear, vanish," marnu- "to make disappear;" Armenian meranim "to die;" Greek marainein "to consume, exhaust, put out, quench," marasmus "consumption," emorten "died," brotos "mortal" (hence ambrotos "immortal"); Latin mors (genitive mortis) "death," mori "to die;" Armenian merani- "to die;" Gothic maurþr, Old English morþ "murder;" Old Irish marb, Welsh marw "dead;" Lithuanian mirti "to die," mirtis "death;" Old Church Slavonic mreti "to die," mrutvu "dead;" Russian mertvyj, Serbo-Croatian mrtav "dead."

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deathless (adj.)

"not subject to death or destruction, immortal," 1580s, from death + -less. Related: Deathlessly; deathlessness.

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ambrosial (adj.)
1590s, "immortal, divine, of the quality of ambrosia;" see ambrosia + -al. Sense of "Fragrant, delicious" is from 1660s. Other adjectives were ambrosiac (c. 1600); ambrosian (1630s).
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Amritsar 
city in Punjab, from Sanskrit amrta "immortal" (from a- "not," from PIE root *ne-, + mrta "dead," from PIE root *mer- "to rub away, harm") + saras "lake, pool."
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undying (adj.)
c. 1300, "immortal," from un- (1) "not" + present participle of die (v.). Figurative sense, of feelings, etc., is recorded from c. 1765.
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undead (adj.)
"neither dead nor alive," c. 1400, from un- (1) "not" + dead. As a noun meaning "vampires and such," from 1904. Old English undeadlic (adv.) meant "immortal, for all eternity."
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