Etymology
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immediate (adj.)
late 14c., "intervening, interposed;" early 15c., "with nothing interposed; direct," also with reference to time, "without delay, instant," from Old French immediat (14c.), from Late Latin immediatus "without anything between," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + mediatus "in the middle" (see mediate).
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immediately (adv.)
"without intervening time or space, directly," early 15c., from immediate + -ly (2).
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immediatism (n.)
"advocacy of immediate action" (originally with reference to abolition of slavery in the U.S.), 1834, from immediate + -ism.
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immediacy (n.)
c. 1600, from immediate + abstract noun suffix -cy. Middle English had immediacioun "close connection, proximity" (mid-15c.).
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cashier (n.)

"person in charge of money," 1590s, from French caissier "treasurer," from caisse "money box" (see cash (n.)). The immediate source of the English word might be Middle Dutch kassier.

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absent-minded (adj.)
also absentminded, "so preoccupied as to be forgetful of one's immediate surroundings," 1810, from absent (adj.) + -minded. Absence of mind "habitual or temporary forgetfulness" is from 1782. Related: Absent-mindedly; absent-mindedness.
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anorexic (adj.)
1876; see anorexia + -ic. The immediate source or model is perhaps French anorexique. As a noun meaning "person with anorexia nervosa" it is attested from 1913.
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percept (n.)

"immediate object in perception," 1837, from Latin perceptum "(a thing) perceived," noun use of neuter past participle of percipere "to perceive" (see perceive). Formed on model of concept.

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instant (n.)
late 14c., "moment in time, infinitely short space of time," from noun use of Old French instant "near, immediate, at hand; assiduous, urgent" (see instant (adj.)). Related: Instanted; instanting.
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heortology (n.)
"study of religious feasts and calendars," 1881, from Greek heorte "a feast or festival, holiday," + -ology. The immediate source of the English word is in French or German. Related: Heortological (1880).
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