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imitative (adj.)

1580s, probably from imitate + -ive; or else from French imitatif, from Late Latin imitativus, from imitat-, stem of Latin imitari "to copy, portray" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy").

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*aim- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to copy." 

It forms all or part of: emulate; emulation; emulous;  image; imaginary; imagination; imaginative; imagine; imago; imitable; imitate; imitative; imitator; inimitable.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin imago "image," aemulus "emulous," imitari "to copy, portray, imitate;" Hittite himma- "imitation, substitute."

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whop (v.)
"to beat, strike," mid-15c., of imitative origin. Compare Welsh chwap "a stroke," also of imitative origin; also see wap. Related: Whopped; whopping.
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emulator (n.)
1580s, "rival, competitor," from Latin aemulator "a zealous imitator, imitative rival," agent noun from aemulari "to rival" (see emulation). The meaning "imitative rival" in English is from 1650s.
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whicker (v.)
1650s, "snigger," imitative (compare snicker). As imitative of a sound made by a horse, from 1753. As the sound of something beating the air, from 1920. Related: Whickered; whickering.
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bong (n.1)

bell-sound, 1918, imitative.

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yar 
growling sound, imitative, attested from c. 1300.
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yuck (2)
"laugh," 1938, yock, probably imitative.
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hinny (v.)
"to neigh," c. 1400, of imitative origin.
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