Etymology
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imitation (n.)

c. 1400, "emulation; act of copying," from Old French imitacion, from Latin imitationem (nominative imitatio) "a copying, imitation," noun of action from past participle stem of imitari "to copy, portray, imitate," from PIE *im-eto-, from root *aim- "to copy." Meaning "an artificial likeness" is from c. 1600. As an adjective, from 1840.

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imitate (v.)

1530s, a back-formation from imitation or imitator, or else from Latin imitatus, past participle of imitari "to copy, portray" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy"). Related: Imitated; imitating. An Old English word for this was æfterhyrigan.

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mimesis (n.)

in rhetoric, "imitation or reproduction of the words of another," especially in order to represent his character, 1540s, from Greek mimēsis "imitation, representation, representation by art," from mimeisthai "to mimic, represent, imitate, portray," in art, "to express by means of imitation," from mimos "mime" (see mime (n.)). In zoology, "mimicry," by 1845.

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brekekekex 
Greek (Aristophanes) imitation of the croaking of frogs.
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hic 
imitation of the sound of hiccuping, attested by 1883 (see hiccup).
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la-di-da (interj.)
mocking affected gentility, 1874, a derisive imitation of the "swell" way of talking. Compare lardy-dardy (1859).
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lordy (interj.)
1832, in imitation of African-American vernacular; extended form of Lord (n.) as an interjection.
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mimic (adj.)

"acting as a mime, practicing imitation, consisting of or resulting from mimicry," 1590s, from Latin mimicus, from Greek mimikos "of or pertaining to mimes," verbal adjective from mimeisthai "to mimic, represent, imitate, portray," in art, "to express by means of imitation," from mimos "mime" (see mime (n.)).

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mimic (v.)

"act in imitation of, imitate or copy in speech or action," 1680s, from mimic (n.). Related: Mimicked; mimicking.

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velveteen (n.)
imitation velvet (made with cotton in place of silk), 1776, from velvet + commercial suffix -een (variant of -ine).
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