Etymology
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Gondal 
imaginary land invented by the Brontë sisters, also the name of its inhabitants.
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Ruritanian (adj.)

"utopian," 1896, from Ruritania, name of an imaginary kingdom in "The Prisoner of Zenda" (1894) by Anthony Hope (1863-1933), who coined it from Latin rus (genitive ruris) "country" (see rural) + Latinate ending -itania (as in Lusitania, Mauritania). Ruritania as a recognizable generic name for an imaginary country lasted into the 1970s.

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Brobdingnag 
(not *brobdignag), 1727, Swift's name in "Gulliver's Travels" for an imaginary country where everything was on a gigantic scale.
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Shangri-La (n.)

imaginary earthly paradise, by 1938, from Shangri-La, name of Tibetan utopia in James Hilton's novel "Lost Horizon" (1933, film version 1937). In Tibetan, la means "mountain pass."

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Passamaquoddy 

Native American tribe of southeast Maine, from Micmac (Algonquian), literally "place where pollack are plentiful," or else, if it originally is a tribal name and not a place-name, "those of the place of many pollack."

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Aden 
place in southern Arabia, ultimately from Akkadian edinnu "plain," which some think also is the root of Biblical Eden. The two place-names sometimes were treated as synonymous in English (Byron, Poe, etc.).
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Rushmore 

surname attested from c. 1200, Russemere, from place names.

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Chicago (n.)

town founded in 1833, named from a Canadian French form of an Algonquian word, which, according to Bright, is either Fox /sheka:ko:heki/ "place of the wild onion," or Ojibwa shika:konk "at the skunk place" (sometimes rendered "place of the bad smell"). The Ojibwa "skunk" word is distantly related to the New England Algonquian word that yielded Modern English skunk (n.). Related: Chicagoan (1847; Chicagoian is from 1859).

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Quonset hut 

1942, from Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Rhode Island, where this type of structure was first built, in 1941. The place name is from a southern New England Algonquian language and perhaps means "small, long place."

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Mortimer 
masc. proper name and surname, from Mortemer, name of a place in Normandy.
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