Etymology
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illustration (n.)
c. 1400, "a shining;" early 15c., "a manifestation;" mid-15c., "a spiritual illumination," from Old French illustration "apparition, appearance" (13c.) and directly from Latin illustrationem (nominative illustratio) "vivid representation" (in writing), literally "an enlightening," from past participle stem of illustrare "light up, make light, illuminate;" figuratively "make clear, disclose, explain; adorn, render distinguished," from assimilated form of in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + lustrare "make bright, illuminate," from suffixed form of PIE root *leuk- "light, brightness." Mental sense of "act of making clear in the mind" is from 1580s. Meaning "an illustrative picture" is from 1816.
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illustrative (adj.)

"tending to illustrate," 1640s, from illustrat-, past-participle stem of Latin illustrare (see illustration) + -ive.

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illustrate (v.)
1520s, "light up, shed light on;" 1610s, "educate by means of examples," back-formation from illustration, and in some cases from Latin illustratus, past participle of illustrare "light up, make light, illuminate." Sense of "provide pictures to explain or decorate" is 1630s. Related: Illustrated; illustrating.
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illustrious (adj.)

1560s, "distinguished by greatness, renowned," from Latin illustris "lighted, bright, brilliant;" figuratively "distinguished, famous," probably a back-formation from illustrare "make light, light up, illuminate," figuratively "embellish, distinguish, make famous" (see illustration). Replaced illustre in same sense (mid-15c.), from French illustre.

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iconography (n.)
1670s, "illustration by drawing or figures," from Medieval Latin iconographia, from Greek eikonographia "sketch, description," from eikon (see icon) + -graphia (see -graphy). Related: Iconographic; iconographer.
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photomontage (n.)

"use of photographs or photographic negatives to make art or illustration," 1931, from photo + montage.

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letter-press (adj.)
in reference to matter printed from relief surfaces, 1840, from letter (n.1) "a type character" + press (n.). Earlier "text," as opposed to copper-plate illustration (1771).
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illustrated (adj.)
"provided with drawings, etc., as illustration," 1831, past-participle adjective from illustrate (v.).
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pencil (v.)

c. 1500, pencellen, "apply (gold or silver) in manuscript illustration;" 1530s, "to mark or sketch with a pencil-brush," from pencil (n.). In reference to lead pencils from 1760s. Related: Penciled; penciling. To pencil (something) in in the figurative sense of "arrange tentatively" (on the notion of being erasable) is attested by 1942.

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exemplification (n.)

mid-15c., exemplificacioun, "illustration or demonstration by example," from Anglo-French exemplificacion "attested copy or transcript of a document" (late 14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin exemplificationem (nominative exemplificatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of exemplificare "to illustrate" (see exemplify). Holinshed had a back-formation exemplificate.

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