Etymology
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illicit (adj.)
c. 1500, from Old French illicite "unlawful, forbidden" (14c.), from Latin illicitus "not allowed, unlawful, illegal," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + licitus "lawful," past participle of licere "to be allowed" (see licence (n.)). Related: Illicitly.
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rum-runner (n.)
"smuggler or transporter of illicit liquor," 1919, from rum (n.) + runner.
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love-child (n.)

"child born out of wedlock, child of illicit love," 1798, from love (n.) + child. Compare German Liebeskind. Earlier was love brat (17c.).

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concupiscent (adj.)

"characterized by illicit desire, lustful," mid-15c., from Latin concupiscentem (nominative concupiscens), present participle of concupiscere "to long for, covet" (see concupiscence).

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intrigue (n.)
1640s, "a clandestine plot;" 1660s, "secret plotting," probably from intrigue (v.). Also used from 1660s as "clandestine or illicit sexual encounter."
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concupiscence (n.)

"ardent desire, improper or illicit desire, lustful feeling," mid-14c., from Old French concupiscence and directly from Late Latin concupiscentia "eager desire," from present-participle stem of Latin concupiscere, inceptive of concupere "to be very desirous of," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + cupere "to long for" (see cupidity). Used in Vulgate to translate Greek epithymia.

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jigger (n.1)

"1.5-ounce shot glass," 1836, American English, in early use also of the drink itself, probably from jigger "illicit distillery" (1824), a word of unknown origin. Or else perhaps from jigger (n.2) "tiny mite or flea." As a name for various appliances the word is attested by 1726, from jig. In telegraphy it was a small transformer used for regulating and maintaining the difference of potential between terminals.

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fornicate (v.)
1550s, "have illicit sexual intercourse" (said of an unmarried person), from Late Latin fornicatus, past participle of fornicari "to fornicate," from Latin fornix (genitive fornicis) "brothel" (Juvenal, Horace), originally "arch, vaulted chamber, a vaulted opening, a covered way," probably an extension, based on appearance, from a source akin to fornus "brick oven of arched or domed shape" (from PIE root *gwher- "to heat, warm"). Perhaps in some cases a back-formation from fornication. Related: Fornicated; fornicating.
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left-handed (adj.)
late 14c., of persons, "having the left hand stronger or more capable than the right;" 1650s of tools, etc., "designed for use with the left hand," from left (adj.) + -handed. In 15c. it also could mean "maimed." Sense of "underhanded" is from early 17c., as in left-handed compliment (1787, also attested 1855 in pugilism slang for "a punch with the left fist"), as is that of "illicit" (as in left-handed marriage, for which see morganatic; 17c. slang left-handed wife "concubine"). Related: Left-handedly; left-handedness.
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amour (n.)

c. 1300, "love," from Old French amor "love, affection, friendship; loved one" (11c.), from Latin amor "love, affection, strong friendly feeling" (of feelings for sons or brothers, but it especially meant sexual love), from amare "to love" (see Amy). The accent shifted 15c.-17c. to the first syllable as the word became nativized, then shifted back as the sense "illicit love affair" became primary 17c. and the word was felt to be a euphemism.

A common ME word for love, later accented ámour (cf. enamour). Now with suggestion of intrigue and treated as a F[rench] word. [Weekley]
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