Etymology
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ignoble (adj.)

mid-15c., "of low birth;" 1590s as "not honorable, of low character;" from French ignoble (14c.), from Latin ignobilis "unknown, undistinguished, obscure; of base birth, not noble," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + gnobilis "well-known, famous, renowned, of superior birth," from PIE root *gno- "to know." Related: Ignobly; ignobility.

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*gno- 

*gnō-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to know."

It forms all or part of: acknowledge; acquaint; agnostic; anagnorisis; astrognosy; can (v.1) "have power to, be able;" cognition; cognizance; con (n.2) "study;" connoisseur; could; couth; cunning; diagnosis; ennoble; gnome; (n.2) "short, pithy statement of general truth;" gnomic; gnomon; gnosis; gnostic; Gnostic; ignoble; ignorant; ignore; incognito; ken (n.1) "cognizance, intellectual view;" kenning; kith; know; knowledge; narrate; narration; nobility; noble; notice; notify; notion; notorious; physiognomy; prognosis; quaint; recognize; reconnaissance; reconnoiter; uncouth; Zend.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit jna- "know;" Avestan zainti- "knowledge," Old Persian xšnasatiy "he shall know;" Old Church Slavonic znati "recognizes," Russian znat "to know;" Latin gnoscere "get to know," nobilis "known, famous, noble;" Greek gignōskein "to know," gnōtos "known," gnōsis "knowledge, inquiry;" Old Irish gnath "known;" German kennen "to know," Gothic kannjan "to make known."

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parvanimity (n.)

"state of having a little or ignoble mind," 1690s, from Latin parvus "small" (see parvi-) + ending from magnanimity.

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drudgery (n.)

"the labor of a drudge; ignoble, spiritless toil," 1540s, from drudge (v.) + -ery.

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narrow-minded (adj.)

also narrowminded, "bigoted, illiberal, of confined views or sentiments," 1620s, from narrow (adj.) + -minded. Related: Narrow-mindedness. Middle English had narrow-hearted "mean, ungenerous, ignoble" (c. 1200).

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comical (adj.)

1550s, "of or pertaining to comedy," from comic (or Latin comicus) + -al (1). Meaning "funny, exciting mirth" is from 1680s. Also sometimes in 17c. "befitting comedy, low, ignoble." Related: Comicality; comicalness.

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banausic (adj.)
"merely mechanical," coined 1845 from Greek banausikos "pertaining to mechanics," from banausos "artisan, mere mechanical," hence (to the Greeks) "base, ignoble;" sometimes said to be literally "working by fire," from baunos "furnace, forge" (but Beekes dismisses this as folk etymology and calls it a pre-Greek word of uncertain origin).
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madding (adj.)

"becoming mad, acting madly, raging, furious," 1570s, present-participle adjective from obsolete verb mad "to make insane; to become insane" (replaced by madden); now principally in the phrase far from the madding crowd, title of the popular 1874 novel of love and betrayal in rural England by Hardy, who lifted it from "Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife," a line of Gray's "Elegy" (1749), which seems to echo and smooth a line from Drummond of Hawthornden from 1614 ("Farre from the madding Worldling's hoarse discords"). Related: Maddingly.

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