Etymology
Advertisement
if (conj.)

"in case that; granting, allowing, or supposing that; on condition that;" also "although, notwithstanding that," Old English gif (initial g- in Old English pronounced with a sound close to Modern English -y-) "if, whether, so," from Proto-Germanic *ja-ba (source also of Old Saxon, Old Norse ef, Old Frisian gef, Old High German ibu, German ob, Dutch of "if, whether"), of uncertain origin or relation. Perhaps from PIE pronominal stem *i- [Watkins]; but Klein, OED suggest it probably originally from an oblique case of a noun meaning "doubt" (compare Old High German iba "condition, stipulation, doubt," Old Norse if "doubt, hesitation," Swedish jäf "exception, challenge"). As a noun from 1510s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
iffy (adj.)
1937, American English, from if + -y (2). Originally associated with President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Related entries & more 
sayonara 

"farewell, good-bye," 1875, from Japanese, said to mean literally "if it is to be that way," from sayo "that way," + nara "if."

Related entries & more 
quasi (adv.)

"as if, as it were," used in introducing a proposed or possible explanation, late 15c., a Latin word used in Latin in hypothetical comparisons, "as if, just as if, as though;" in real comparisons "just as, as;" and in approximation, "somewhat like, nearly, not far from." It is from quam "as" relative pronominal adverb of manner (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns) + si "if" (from PIE pronominal stem *swo- "so;" see so).

Related entries & more 
unmerited (adj.)

1640s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of merit (v.).

"An ingenuous mind feels in unmerited praise the bitterest reproof. If you reject it you are unhappy, if you accept it you are undone." [Walter Savage Landor, "Imaginary Conversations"]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
inshallah (interj.)

1818, phonological spelling of Arabic in sha Allah "if Allah wills (it)."

Related entries & more 
Deo volente 

1767, Latin, "God willing," that is, "if nothing prevents it, if it is meant to be," a sort of verbal knock on wood, from ablative of Deus "God" (see Zeus) + ablative of volentem, present participle of velle "to wish, will" (see will (v.)). Often abbreviated D.V.

Related entries & more 
keck (v.)
"to heave as if to vomit," 1530s, imitative of the sound involved. Related: Kecked; kecking; keckish.
Related entries & more 
rigidulous (adj.)

"rather stiff," 1858, a dictionary word, as if from a diminutive of Latin rigidus (see rigid).

Related entries & more 
rarebit (n.)

1785, an absurd perversion of (Welsh) rabbit, as if from rare (adj.) + bit (n.). See Welsh.

Related entries & more