Etymology
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impeachable (adj.)

early 15c., empechable, "liable to impeachment," from Old French; see impeach + -able. Related: impeachably; impeachability.

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impeachment (n.)
late 14c., enpechement "accusation, charge," from Old French empeechement "difficulty, hindrance; (legal) impeachment," from empeechier "to hinder, impede" (see impeach). As a judicial proceeding on charges of maladministration against a public official, from 1640s.
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impeccable (adj.)

1530s, "not capable of sin," from French impeccable (15c.) or directly from Late Latin impeccabilis "not liable to sin," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + peccare "to sin" (see peccadillo). Meaning "faultless" is from 1610s. Related: Impeccably; impeccant; impeccancy.

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impecunious (adj.)
"lacking in money," 1590s, from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + Latin pecuniosus "rich," from pecunia "money, property" (see pecuniary). Related: Impecuniously; impecuniosity.
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impedance (n.)
"hindrance," especially and originally "resistance due to induction in an electrical circuit," 1886, from impede + -ance. The classically correct formation would be *impedience.
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impede (v.)
c. 1600, back-formation from impediment, or else from Latin impedire "impede, be in the way, hinder, detain," literally "to shackle the feet," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + pes (genitive pedis) "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot." Related: Impeded; impedes; impeding; impedient.
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impediment (n.)
c. 1400, from Old French empedement or directly from Latin impedimentum "hindrance," from impedire "impede," literally "to shackle the feet," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + pes (genitive pedis) "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot." Related: Impedimental.
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impedimenta (n.)
"traveling equipment," c. 1600, from Latin impedimenta "luggage, military baggage," literally "hindrances," on the notion of "that by which one is impeded;" plural of impedimentum "hindrance" (see impediment).
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impel (v.)
early 15c., from Latin impellere "to push, strike against; set in motion, drive forward, urge on," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + pellere "to push, drive" (from PIE root *pel- (5) "to thrust, strike, drive"). Related: Impelled; impelling.
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impeller (n.)
1680s, agent noun from impel (v.). As a machine part from 1836.
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