Etymology
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hybrid (n.)
c. 1600, "offspring of plants or animals of different variety or species," from Latin hybrida, variant of ibrida "mongrel," specifically "offspring of a tame sow and a wild boar," of unknown origin but probably from Greek and somehow related to hubris. A rare word before the general sense "anything a product of two heterogeneous things" emerged c. 1850. The adjective is attested from 1716. As a noun meaning "automobile powered by an engine that uses both electricity and gasoline," 2002, short for hybrid vehicle, etc.
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hybridity (n.)

"state or condition of being hybrid," 1823, from hybrid + -ity.

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hybridize (v.)

1802, intransitive, "cross or inter-breed," from hybrid + -ize. Transitive sense of "cause to interbreed" is by 1823. Related: Hybridized; hybridizing.

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workplace (n.)
1828, a hybrid from work (n.) + place (n.).
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kitchenette (n.)
1905, American English, a hybrid from kitchen + -ette.
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burnable (adj.)
"capable of being burned," 1610s, a hybrid from burn (v.) + -able.
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immunology (n.)
by 1906, a hybrid from immune + -ology. Related: Immunological; immunologist.
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