Etymology
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hush (n.)
"state of stillness," 1680s, from hush (v.).
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puppy (n.)

late 15c., "woman's small pet dog," a word of uncertain origin but likely to be from French poupée "doll, toy" (see puppet). "A little dog appears to have been called puppy because petted as a doll or puppet" [Century Dictionary].

The meaning shifted from "toy dog" to "young dog" (1590s), replacing native whelp. In early use in English the words puppet and puppy were not always distinguished. The word also was used from about that time in the contemptuous sense of "vain or silly young man."

Puppy-dog is attested by 1590s (in Shakespeare, puppi-dogges). Puppy love "juvenile infatuation" is from 1823. Puppy fat "excessive fat on a child or adolescent" is by 1913 (in reference to young dogs by 1894).

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hush (v.)

1540s (trans.), 1560s (intrans.), variant of Middle English huisht (late 14c.), probably of imitative origin, with terminal -t lost probably by being mistaken for a past tense suffix. The sounds chosen presumably for "being sibilations requiring the least muscular effort and admitting of the faintest utterance" [Century Dictionary]. Related: Hushed; hushing.

Figurative use from 1630s. As an interjection meaning "be quiet," attested by c. 1600. To hush (one's) mouth "be quiet" is attested from 1878. Hush up "suppress talk for secrecy's sake" is from 1630s. Hush-money "bribe paid to ensure silence" is attested from 1709. Hush-puppy "deep-fried ball of cornmeal batter" first attested 1899; as a type of lightweight soft shoe, it is a proprietary name, registered 1961.

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puppyish (adj.)

"of the nature or character of a puppy," 1775, from puppy + -ish. Related: Puppyishness.

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puppify (v.)
"make a puppy of, befool" [OED], 1640s, from puppy (n.) + -fy. Related: Puppified.
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bumble (v.)
"to flounder, blunder," 1530s, probably of imitative origin. Related: Bumbled; bumbler; bumbling. Bumble-puppy (1801) was a name for various outdoor sports and games.
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pup (n.)

1760, "young dog," shortened form of puppy (q.v.). Used earlier (from 1580s) for "conceited person," from the figurative sense of puppy. An English-Latin wordbook from late 15c. for Latin pupa gives English pup-bairn. Applied to the young of the fur seal from 1815. Used for "inexperienced person" by 1890.

Pup tent (also dog tent) as a type of small tent used in the military is from 1863. Sopwith pup, popular name of the Sopwith Scout Tractor airplane, is from 1917.

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whelp (n.)
Old English hwelp "whelp, young of the dog," from a Germanic root related to Old Saxon hwelp, Old Norse hvelpr, Dutch welp, German hwelf; of unknown origin. Now largely displaced by puppy. Also applied to wild animals. Sense of "scamp" first recorded early 14c.
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