Etymology
Advertisement
gathering (n.)

mid-12c., gadering, "an assembly of people, act of coming together," from late Old English gaderung "a gathering together, union, collection, assembly," verbal noun from gather (v.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hunting (n.)

modification of Old English huntung "a hunt, chase; what is hunted, game," verbal noun from hunt (v.). Bartlett (1848) notes it as the word commonly used by sportsmen in the Southern states of the U.S. where in the North they use gunning. Happy hunting-grounds "Native American afterlife paradise" is from "Last of the Mohicans" (1826); hunting-ground in a Native American context is from 1777.

Related entries & more 
wool-gathering (n.)

also woolgathering, 1550s, "indulging in wandering fancies and purposeless thinking," from the literal meaning "gathering fragments of wool torn from sheep by bushes, etc.," an activity that necessitates much wandering to little purpose. See wool + gather.

Related entries & more 
fox-hunting (n.)

1670s, from fox (n.) + hunting (n.). Fox-hunt (n.) is by 1807; it also is known as a fox-chase. Related: Fox-hunter.

Related entries & more 
meet (n.)

1831 in the sporting sense, "a gathering of huntsmen for fox-hunting," from meet (v.). Later of bicyclists gathering for a ride, etc.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hafla (n.)

in reference to belly-dance performance and social gathering, by 1998, from Arabic hafla "party, social or family gathering."

Related entries & more 
kibbutz (n.)

"Israeli collective settlement," 1931, from Modern Hebrew qibbus "gathering," earlier "a gathering together," verbal noun from root of qibbetz "he gathered together." Plural is kibbutzim. Related to Arabic quabada "he grasped, seized."

Related entries & more 
be-in (n.)

"a public gathering of hippies" [OED], 1967, from be + in (adv.).

Related entries & more 
social (n.)

"friendly gathering," 1870, from social (adj.). In late 17c. it meant "a companion, associate."

Related entries & more 
workshop (n.)

1580s, from work (n.) + shop (n.). Meaning "gathering for study, etc.," is from 1937.

Related entries & more