Etymology
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Hungary 
c. 1300, from Medieval Latin Hungaria (also source of French Hongrie), probably literally meaning "land of the Huns," who ruled a vast territory from there under Attila in 5c. The people's name for themselves we transliterate as Magyar. Middle English uses the same words for both Attila's people and the Magyars, who appeared in Europe in 9c. and established a kingdom in 1000. From the same source as Medieval Greek Oungroi, German Ungarn, Russian Vengriya, Ukrainian Ugorshchina. The Turkish name for the country, Macaristan, reflects the indigenous name. Related: Hungarian (1550s as a noun, c. 1600 as an adjective).
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Bohunk (n.)

U.S. derogatory slang for "lower-class immigrant from Central or Eastern Europe," by 1899, probably from Bohemian (see Bohemia) + a distortion of Hungarian (see Hungary).

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Pannonia 

ancient name of the region roughly corresponding now to western Hungary, from Latin, from Greek Pannonia. Related: Pannonian; Pannonic.

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Rubik's Cube (n.)

1980, named for teacher Ernö Rubik (born 1944) who patented it in Hungary in 1975.

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tokay (n.)
1710, rich sweet wine from the region of Tokay (Hungarian Tokaj) a town in Hungary. The name is perhaps Slavic, from tok "current," or Hungarian, from a Turkic personal name.
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polyethnic (adj.)

"inhabited by or containing many races or nationalities," 1885, in reference to Austria-Hungary, from poly- "many" + ethnic (adj.).

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Magyar (n.)

"a Hungarian," a member of the Finno-Ugrian race which invaded Hungary about the end of the 9c. and settled there, 1797, the people's native name, possibly from the name of a prominent tribe among them. As an adjective by 1828.

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Kafkaesque (adj.)
1947, resembling such situations as are explored in the fiction of Franz Kafka (1883-1924), German-speaking Jewish novelist born in Prague, Austria-Hungary. The surname is Czech German, literally "jackdaw," and is imitative.
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paprika (n.)

condiment made from types of dried, ground sweet red peppers, 1839, from Hungarian paprika, a diminutive from Serbo-Croatian papar "pepper," from Latin piper or Modern Greek piperi (see pepper (n.)). A condiment made from a New World plant, introduced into Eastern Europe by the Turks; known in Hungary by 1569.

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Illyria 
ancient name of the country on the east shore of the Adriatic, at its greatest extending inland to the Danube, a name of obscure origin. Later a name of a division of Austria-Hungary including Carinthia, Slovenia, and the coastal region around Istria. Related: Illyrian.
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