Etymology
Advertisement
hundred (adj., n.)

"1 more than ninety-nine, ten times ten; the number which is one more than ninety-nine; a symbol representing this number;" Old English hundred "the number of 100, a counting of 100," from Proto-Germanic *hunda-ratha- (source also of Old Frisian hundred, Old Saxon hunderod, Old Norse hundrað, German hundert); first element is Proto-Germanic *hundam "hundred" (cognate with Gothic hund, Old High German hunt), from PIE *km-tom "hundred," reduced from *dkm-tom- (source also of Sanskrit satam, Avestan satem, Greek hekaton, Latin centum, Lithuanian šimtas, Old Church Slavonic suto, Old Irish cet, Breton kant "hundred"), suffixed form of root *dekm- "ten."

The second element is Proto-Germanic *rath "reckoning, number" (as in Gothic raþjo "a reckoning, account, number," garaþjan "to count;" from PIE root *re- "to reason, count"). The common word for the number in Old English was simple hund, and Old English also used hund-teontig.

In Old Norse hundrath meant 120, that is the long hundred of six score, and at a later date, when both the six-score hundred and the five-score hundred were in use, the old or long hundred was styled hundrath tolf-roett ... meaning "duodecimal hundred," and the new or short hundred was called hundrath ti-rætt, meaning "decimal hundred." "The Long Hundred and its use in England" was discussed by Mr W.H. Stevenson, in 1889, in the Archæological Review (iv. 313-27), where he stated that amongst the Teutons, who longest preserved their native customs unimpaired by the influence of Latin Christianity, the hundred was generally the six-score hundred. The short hundred was introduced among the Northmen in the train of Christianity. [Transactions of the Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society, 1907]

Meaning "division of a county or shire with its own court" (still in some British place names and U.S. state of Delaware) was in Old English and probably represents 100 hides of land. The Hundred Years War (which ran intermittently from 1337 to 1453) was first so called in 1874. The original Hundred Days was the period between Napoleon's restoration and his final abdication in 1815.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hundredweight (n.)
1540s, from hundred + weight. Commonly 100 lbs., but it could vary locally and in specific uses up to 120 lbs.
Related entries & more 
hundredfold (n.)
c. 1200, "a hundred times as much," from hundred + -fold. Similar formation in German hundertfalt. Old English had hundfeald.
Related entries & more 
centavo (n.)

small coin of Spain, Portugal, and some Latin American countries, 1883, from Spanish, from Latin centum "hundred" (see hundred).

Related entries & more 
centi- 
word-forming element meaning "one hundred" or "one hundredth part," used in English from c. 1800, from the French metric system, from Latin centi-, combining form of centum "one hundred" (see hundred).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
centennial (adj.)

"consisting of or lasting 100 years, happening every 100 years," 1789, from Latin centum "one hundred" (see hundred) + ending from biennial. As a noun, "a hundredth anniversary celebration," from 1876; the older noun is centenary.

Related entries & more 
percent 

"by the hundred;" with a preceding numeral expressing a proportion of the whole amount, 1560s, per cent, from Modern Latin per centum "by the hundred" (see per and see hundred). Until early 20c. often treated as an abbreviation and punctuated accordingly.

Related entries & more 
centimeter (n.)

also centimetre, metric measure of length, "one hundredth of a meter," 1801, from French centimètre (18c.), coined from Latin centum "hundred" (see hundred) + French mètre (see meter (n.2)).

Related entries & more 
cinquecento (n.)

also cinque-cento, "the sixteenth century" (in reference to Italian art and literature), 1760, from Italian cinquecento, literally "500," short for mil cinquecento "1500." See cinque + hundred, and compare quattrocento. Also as an adjective.

Related entries & more 
hundredth (adj., n.)

"next in order after the ninety-ninth; an ordinal numeral; being one of one hundred equal parts into which a whole is regarded as divided;" early 14c., "one of 100 equal parts," from hundred + -th (1). According to OED, Old English had no ordinal form. The hymn tune known as Old Hundredth is attested from mid-16c., so called because later it was set to the 100th Psalm in the old numbering of the psalter.

Related entries & more