Etymology
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historic (adj.)
1660s, "of or belonging to history," probably a back-formation from historical, perhaps influenced by French historique. Meaning "what is noted or celebrated in history" is from 1794.

Though both historic and historical have been used in both senses by respected authors, now the tendency is to reserve historic for what is noted or celebrated in history; historical for what deals with history. The earliest adjective form of the word in English was historial (late 14c., from Late Latin historialis), which meant "belonging to history; dealing with history; literal, factual, authentic," and also "of historical importance" (early 15c.).
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ahistoric (adj.)
"not historical, lacking in historical background or justification," 1911, from a- (2) "not" + historic.
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historicism (n.)
1856, translating German historismus (by 1835), from historic + -ism. Given various senses 20c. in theology, philosophy, architecture, etc.
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prehistoric (adj.)

also pre-historic, "of or pertaining to times before recorded history, existing in or relating to time antecedent to the beginning of recorded history," 1851, perhaps modeled on French préhistorique; see pre- + historic. Related: Prehistorical.

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historical (adj.)
early 15c., "of or pertaining to history, conveying information from the past," with -al (1) + Latin historicus "of history, historical," from Greek historikos "historical; of or for inquiry," from historia (see history). For sense differentiation, see historic. Meaning "narrated or mentioned in history" (as opposed to what is fiction or legend) is from 1843. Related: Historically.
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-ical 
compound adjectival word-forming element, usually interchangeable with -ic but sometimes with specialized sense (such as historic/historical, politic/political), Middle English, from Late Latin -icalis, from Latin -icus + -alis (see -al (1)). Probably it was needed because the forms in -ic often took on a noun sense (for example physic). Forms in -ical tend to be attested earlier in English than their twins in -ic.
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preservationist (n.)
"advocate of protecting existing things," 1905, from preservation + -ist; specifically of historic buildings by 1957.
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destrier (n.)

also destrer, "riding horse of a noble breed, war horse," c. 1300, from Old French destrer, destrier (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *dextrarius "led by the right hand," from Latin dextra, fem. of dexter "right (hand)" (from PIE root *deks- "right; south"). So called because it was led at the right hand until wanted in battle. The spelling destrer was usual in Middle English; destrier was used later, in deliberately archaic or historic contexts.

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spirituality (n.)

late 14c., spiritualite, "the clergy," also "ecclesiastical property; things pertaining to the Church," from Anglo-French spiritualite, Old French espiritualite, and directly from Late Latin spiritualitatem (nominative spiritualitas), from Latin spiritualis (see spiritual). Meaning "quality of being spiritual" is from c. 1500; seldom-used sense of "fact or condition of being a spirit" is from 1680s. Also in early use spiritualty (late 14c.).

English is blessed with multiple variant forms of many words. But it has made scant use of them; for every pair historic/historical; realty/reality, or luxuriant/luxurious there is a spiritualty/spirituality or a specialty/speciality, with two distinct forms, two senses requiring differentiation, hundreds of years gone by, and but little progress made in in sorting them out.

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historicity (n.)
"quality of being true as history," 1877, from Latin historicus "of history, historical" (see historical) + -ity.
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