Etymology
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hemo- 
word-forming element meaning "blood," perhaps via Old French hemo-, Latin haemo-, from Greek haimo-, contraction of haimato-, combining form of haima "blood" (see -emia).
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histo- 
medical word-forming element, from Greek histos "warp, web," literally "anything set upright," from histasthai "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Taken by 19c. medical writers as the best Greek root from which to form terminology for "tissue, structural element of the animal body."
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histology (n.)

"study of organic tissues," 1847, from histo- "tissue" + -logy. Related: Histological.

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histone (n.)
1885, from German histon (1884); see histo- + -one.
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hemophobia (n.)
1844, from hemo- "blood" + -phobia "fear." Perhaps based on French hémophobie. Originally in reference to fear of medical blood-letting.
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histidine (n.)
complex amino acid, 1896, from German histidin; see histo- + chemical suffix -idine (see -ide + -ine (2)).
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nemo (n.)
Latin, literally "no man, no one, nobody;" probably *ne-hemo, *ne-homo, from PIE root *ne- "not" + homo (see homunculus).
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hemato- 
also haemato-, before vowels hemat-, haemat-, word-forming element in scientific compounds meaning "blood," from Greek haimato-, combining form of haima (genitive haimatos) "blood" (see -emia). Compare hemo-.
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