Etymology
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Galen 
celebrated Greek physician of 2c.; his work still was a foundation of medicine in the Middle Ages and his name is used figuratively for doctors.
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Socratic (adj.)
1630s (Socratical is from 1580s), "of or pertaining to Greek philosopher Socrates" (469-399 B.C.E.), especially in reference to his method of eliciting truth by question and answer, from Latin Socraticus, from Greek Sokratikos "pertaining to Socrates or his school." His name is Greek Sokrates, literally "having safe might."
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Cochise 
(c. 1815-1874), leader of the Chiricahua Apache people; his name is Athabaskan, perhaps from chizh "firewood" (compare ko-chizh "his firewood"), or from ch'izhi "the rough one."
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Hussite (n.)
1530s, follower of John Huss, Bohemian religious reformer burnt in 1415. His name is said to be an abbreviation of the name of his native village, Husinec, literally "goose-pen."
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Lorraine 
region of eastern France, from Medieval Latin Lotharingia (German Lothringen), literally "Lothar's Realm." The name is given to what originally was a part of the lands assigned to Lothair I in the first division of the Carolingian empire at the Treaty of Verdun (843 C.E.). Before his death (855 C.E.), Lothair subdivided his lands among his three sons. His son Lothair II (835-869) was given the middle region, subsequently known as Lotharingia. For the name, see Lothario. Related: Lotharingian.
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Faustian (adj.)
1870, in reference to Johann Faust (c. 1485-1541), German wandering astrologer and wizard, who was reputed to have sold his soul to the Devil. Fantastic tales of his life were told as early as the late 16c., and he was the hero of dramas by Marlowe and Goethe. The Latinized form of his name, faustus, means "of favorable omen."
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Titian (n.)
1824, "a painting by Venetian painter Tiziano Vecellio" (c. 1490-1576), from Englished form of his name. Often also in reference to the tint of bright auburn hair favored by him in his work.
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Peter Principle (n.)

1968, "in a hierarchy, every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence," named for (and by) Laurence Johnston Peter (1919-1990) Canadian-born U.S. educationalist and author, who described it in his book of the same name (1969).

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Actaeon 
in Greek mythology, the name of the hunter who discovered Artemis bathing and was changed by her to a stag and torn to death by his hounds. The name is of unknown origin. Sometimes used figuratively in 17c. for "a cuckold" (because of his "horns").
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Rasputin 

acquired name (Russian, literally "debauchee") of Grigory Yefimovich Novykh (c. 1872-1916), mystic and faith healer who held sway over court of Nicholas II of Russia. His nickname is from his doctrine of "rebirth through sin," that true holy communion must be preceded by immersion in sin. His name has been used figuratively in English from 1937 for anyone felt to wield an insidious and corrupting influence.

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