Etymology
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hickory (n.)

type of North American tree valued for its edible nuts and tough, flexible wood, 1670s, American English, from Algonquian (perhaps Powhatan), shortening of pockerchicory, pocohicora or a similar word, which is sometimes said to be the name for this species of walnut, but Bright calls it "a milky drink made from hickory nuts." Old Hickory as the nickname of U.S. politician Andrew Jackson is recorded from 1815.

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shellbark (n.)

1796 as the name of a type of hickory of eastern North America, short for shellbark hickory, from shell (n.) + bark (n.1).

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shagbark (n.)

type of hickory noted for yielding the best hickory nuts, 1751, American English, from shag (n.) + bark (n.1). The name was earlier given to a type of West Indian tree (1690s).

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pecan (n.)

1712, paccan "the North American pecan tree," or a related hickory, from French pacane, from an Algonquian word meaning "nut" (compare Cree pakan "hard-shelled nut," Ojibwa bagaan, Abenaki pagann, Fox /paka:ni/).

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