Etymology
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hegemon (n.)

1897, originally with reference to the position of Great Britain in the world, from Greek hēgemon "an authority, leader, sovereign" (see hegemony).

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hegemonic (adj.)

"ruling, predominant, supreme," 1650s, from Latinized form of Greek hēgemonikos "ready to lead, capable of command," from hēgemon "leader, an authority" (see hegemony). Earlier in same sense was hegemonical (1610s).

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hegemony (n.)

1560s, "preponderance, dominance, leadership," originally of predominance of one city state or another in Greek history; from Greek hēgemonia "leadership, a leading the way, a going first;" also "the authority or sovereignty of one city-state over a number of others," as Athens in Attica, Thebes in Boeotia; from hēgemon "leader, an authority, commander, sovereign," from hēgeisthai "to lead," perhaps originally "to track down," from PIE *sag-eyo-, from root *sag- "to seek out, track down, trace" (see seek). In reference to modern situations from 1850, at first of Prussia in relation to other German states.

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hegemonism (n.)
1965, in reference to a policy of political domination, on model of imperialism; see hegemony + -ism.
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hegemonist (n.)
"one who advocates a political policy of hegemony," 1898 (in reference to Prussia in Germany); see hegemony + -ist.
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