Etymology
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healthy (adj.)

1550s, "being in a sound state;" also "conducive to health," from health + -y (2). Earlier in the same sense was healthsome (1530s). Related: Healthily; healthiness.

It is wrong to say that certain articles of food are healthy or unhealthy. Wholesome and unwholesome are the right words. A pig may be healthy or unhealthy while alive; but after he is killed and becomes pork, he can enjoy no health, and suffer no sickness. [Eliza Leslie, "Miss Leslie's Behaviour Book," Philadelphia, 1839]

Healthsome is from 1530s in the sense "bestowing health."

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unhealthy (adj.)
1590s, "injurious to health," from un- (1) "not" + healthy (adj.). Earlier unhealthsome (1540s), unhealthful (1570s). Of persons, "sickly," it is attested from 1610s. Related: Unhealthily.
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able-bodied (adj.)
"healthy and sufficiently strong," 1620s; see able + body.
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sanity (n.)

early 15c., "healthy condition," from Old French sanité "health," from Latin sanitatem (nominative sanitas) "health, sanity," from sanus "healthy; sane" (see sane). Meaning "soundness of mind" is attested from c. 1600.

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wholesome (adj.)
c. 1200, "of benefit to the soul," from whole (adj.) in the "healthy" sense + -some (1). Physical sense first attested late 14c. Related: Wholesomely; wholesomeness. Old English had halwende.
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sanitarium (n.)

1829, literally "place dedicated to health," from neuter of Modern Latin *sanitarius, from Latin sanitas "health," from sanus "healthy; sane" (see sane).

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sanitary (adj.)
1823, "pertaining to health," from French sanitaire (1812), from Latin sanitas "health," from sanus "healthy; sane" (see sane). In reference to menstrual pads, first attested 1881 (in sanitary towel).
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healthful (adj.)
late 14c., "wholesome, curative, saving, serving to promote health," from health + -ful. Meaning "free from disease, healthy" is attested from 1540s but is rare. Related: Healthfully; healthfulness.
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sleek (adj.)
1580s, variant of Middle English slike (see slick (adj.)). Originally of healthy-looking animal hair; applied to persons 1630s, with sense of "plump and smooth-skinned." Figurative meaning "slick, fawning, flattering" is from 1590s.
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puericulture (n.)
"science of bringing up healthy children," including prenatal care, 1887, from French puériculture (A. Caron, 1866), from Latin puer "boy, child" (see puerility) + cultura "cultivation" (see culture (n.)).
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