Etymology
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Kennedy 
Irish surname, said to be from Old Irish cinneide "ugly head."
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Istria 
peninsula near the head of the Adriatic Sea, Latin Istria, from Istaevones, name of a Germanic people there, of unknown origin. Related: Istrian (c. 1600).
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Pensacola 

city on the Gulf coast of the Florida panhandle, named for a Muskogean tribe, from Choctaw, literally "hair-people," from pashi "hair of the head" + oklah "people."

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Allen 
masc. proper name and surname, variant of Alan (q.v.). In reference to a wrench, key, screw, etc. with a hexagonal socket or head, 1913, from the Allen Manufacturing Company of Hartford, Connecticut, U.S.
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Ballard 
surname, attested from late 12c., probably meaning "bald head;" see Wyclif's "Stye up, ballard," where Coverdale translates "Come vp here thou balde heade" [2 Kings ii:23-24].
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Priscian (n.)

Late Latin Priscianus, name of the celebrated Roman grammarian (c. 500-530); commonly in the phrase break Priscian's head (1520s) "violate rules of grammar" (Latin diminuere Prisciani caput). For the name, see Priscilla.

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Hooverville 
1933, American English, from U.S. president Herbert C. Hoover (1874-1964), who was in office when the Depression began, + common place-name ending -ville. Earlier his name was the basis of Hooverize "economize on food" (1917) from his role as wartime head of the U.S. Food Administration.
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Cyrus 

masc. proper name, Latinized form of Greek Kyros, from Old Persian Kurush, a name of unknown etymology. In Hebrew the name is Koresh, and in that form it was taken c. 1990 by Wayne Howell of Texas, U.S., when he became head of the Branch Davidian church there.

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Capricorn 

zodiac sign represented as a goat, or half-goat half-fish, late Old English, from Latin Capricornus, literally "horned like a goat," from caper (genitive capri) "goat" (see cab) + cornu "horn" (from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head"). A loan-translation of Greek Aigokherōs, the name of the constellation. Extended 1894 to persons born under the sign.

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Huron 
North American lake, named for the native people who lived nearby, whose name is attested in English from 1650s, from French, from obsolete French huron "bristle-haired" (the French word frequently was used in reference to head-dresses, and that might be its original sense here), from Old French huré "bristly, unkempt, shaggy," which is of uncertain origin, but French sources indicate it probably is from Germanic.
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