Etymology
Advertisement
Beverly Hills 
city in southern California, U.S., 1911, earlier Beverly (1907), named for Beverly Farms, Massachusetts, summer home of then-U.S. President Taft, which ultimately is named for the Yorkshire town Beverly, which means, in Old English, "beaver lodge."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Cheviot (n.)

range of hills between Scotland and England, named for one of them, The Cheviot, attested from 12c. as Chiviet. The name is of uncertain origin; the second element is perhaps Old English geat "gate." As a breed of sheep, 1815.

Related entries & more 
Cotswold 

range of hills in Gloucestershire, literally "wold where there are sheep-cotes;" see cote + wold. Related: Cotswolds.

Related entries & more 
Pensacola 

city on the Gulf coast of the Florida panhandle, named for a Muskogean tribe, from Choctaw, literally "hair-people," from pashi "hair of the head" + oklah "people."

Related entries & more 
Quirinal 

royal palace in Rome, later the Italian presidential palace, 1838, from Mons Quirinalis in Rome (one of the seven hills, site of a former Papal palace), from Quirinus, said to be the divine name of Romulus, but rather one of the original trinity of Roman gods, assimilated to Mars. His feast (Quirinalia) was Feb. 17, the day Romulus was said to have been translated to heaven. Used metonymically for "the Italian civil government" (1917), especially as distinguished from the Vatican.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Priscian (n.)

Late Latin Priscianus, name of the celebrated Roman grammarian (c. 500-530); commonly in the phrase break Priscian's head (1520s) "violate rules of grammar" (Latin diminuere Prisciani caput). For the name, see Priscilla.

Related entries & more 
Kennedy 
Irish surname, said to be from Old Irish cinneide "ugly head."
Related entries & more 
Istria 
peninsula near the head of the Adriatic Sea, Latin Istria, from Istaevones, name of a Germanic people there, of unknown origin. Related: Istrian (c. 1600).
Related entries & more 
Huron 
North American lake, named for the native people who lived nearby, whose name is attested in English from 1650s, from French, from obsolete French huron "bristle-haired" (the French word frequently was used in reference to head-dresses, and that might be its original sense here), from Old French huré "bristly, unkempt, shaggy," which is of uncertain origin, but French sources indicate it probably is from Germanic.
Related entries & more 
Allen 
masc. proper name and surname, variant of Alan (q.v.). In reference to a wrench, key, screw, etc. with a hexagonal socket or head, 1913, from the Allen Manufacturing Company of Hartford, Connecticut, U.S.
Related entries & more