Etymology
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sexless (adj.)

"having or as having no sex, asexual," 1590s, from sex (n.) + -less. Related: Sexlessly; sexlessness.

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inclined (adj.)
c. 1300, "having a mental tendency;" 1540s, "having a physical slope," past-participle adjective from incline (v.).
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digitate (adj.)
Origin and meaning of digitate

1660s, in zoology, "having separate fingers and toes," from Latin digitatus "having fingers or toes," from digitus "finger" (see digit). In botany, "having deep, radiating divisions, like fingers," by 1788.

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tasteful (adj.)
1610s, "having an agreeable taste;" from taste + -ful. From 1756 as "having or showing good taste." Related: Tastefully; tastefulness.
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edged (adj.)
1590s, "having a sharp edge;" 1690s, "having a hem or border," past-participle adjective from edge (v.).
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-ous 
word-forming element making adjectives from nouns, meaning "having, full of, having to do with, doing, inclined to," from Old French -ous, -eux, from Latin -osus (compare -ose (1)). In chemistry, "having a lower valence than forms expressed in -ic."
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fine-toothed (adj.)
c. 1600, "epicurean, having delicate tastes," from fine (adj.) + toothed "having teeth" (of a certain kind); see tooth (n.). By 1703 as "having fine teeth" (of a saw, file, comb, etc.); fine-tooth in this sense attested from 1804.
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colored (adj.)

late 14c., "having a certain color, having a distinguishing hue," also (c. 1400) "having a certain complexion," past-participle adjective from color (v.). From 1610s as "having a dark or black color of the skin;" specifically, in U.S., "being wholly or partly of African descent," though, as Century Dictionary notes (1897) "In census-tables, etc., the term is often used to include Indians, Chinese, etc."

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polyandry (n.)

"state of having more husbands than one at the same time," 1767, nativized form of polyandria, from Greek but taken in senses not found in Greek: "having many husbands," or, in botany, "having many stamens." The Greek word meant "populousness." Related: Polyandrist.

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mailed (adj.)

"having mail armor," late 14c., from mail (n.2). Of animals having protective skin or scales, by 1680s.

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