Etymology
Advertisement
harbor (v.)
Old English herebeorgian "take up quarters, lodge, shelter oneself" (cognate with Old Norse herbergja, Old High German heribergon, Middle Dutch herbergen), verbal formation from here-beorg "lodgings, quarters" (see harbor (n.)). Meaning "give shelter to, protect" is from mid-14c. Figuratively, of thoughts, etc., from late 14c. Related: Harbored; harboring.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
harbor (n.)

"lodging for ships; sheltered recess in a coastline," early 12c., a specialized sense of Middle English herberwe "temporary dwelling place, quarters, lodgings; an inn; the camp of an army in the field," probably from Old English here-beorg (West Saxon), *here-berg (Anglian) "lodgings, quarters," from Proto-Germanic compound *harja-bergaz "shelter, lodgings," from *heri "army, host" (see harry (v.)) + *burzjan- "protection, shelter" (from PIE root *bhergh- (1) "to hide, protect"). Perhaps modeled on Old Norse herbergi "room, lodgings, quarters."

Related entries & more 
spleen (n.)

c. 1300, non-glandular organ of the abdomen, from Old French esplen, from Latin splen, from Greek splen "the milt, spleen," from PIE *spelgh- "spleen, milt" (source also of Sanskrit plihan-, Avestan sperezan, Armenian p'aicaln, Latin lien, Old Church Slavonic slezena, Lithuanian blužnis, Old Prussian blusne, Old Irish selg "spleen").

Regarded in old medicine as the seat of morose feelings and bad temper. Hence figurative sense of "violent ill-temper" (1580s, implied in spleenful); and thence spleenless "free from anger, ill-humor, malice, or spite" (1610s).

Related entries & more 
lieno- 
word-forming element meaning "spleen, pertaining to the spleen, spleen and," from Latin lien "spleen" (see spleen).
Related entries & more 
spleno- 
before vowels splen-, word-forming element meaning "spleen, spleen and," from Greek splen (see spleen).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
splenomegaly (n.)
enlargement of the spleen, 1900, from spleno- + Greek megas "great" (fem. megale; see mickle).
Related entries & more 
milt (n.)
Old English milte "spleen," from Proto-Germanic *miltjo- (source also of Old Frisian milte, Middle Dutch milte, Dutch milt "spleen, milt of fish," Old High German milzi, German milz, Old Norse milti), possibly from PIE root *mel- (1) "soft." Meaning "fish sperm" is late 15c.
Related entries & more 
seaport (n.)

"a harbor on the sea; a city or town on such a harbor," 1590s, from sea + port (n.1).

Related entries & more 
hormonal (adj.)
1926, from hormone + -al (1). Earlier as a noun, the name of a spleen hormone. Related: Hormonally.
Related entries & more 
vent (v.)

late 14c., "emit from a confined space," probably a shortening of aventer "expose oneself to the air" (c. 1300), from Old French eventer "let out, expose to air," from Vulgar Latin *exventare, from Latin ex "out" + ventus "wind" (from PIE *wē-nt-o‑ "blowing," suffixed (participial) form of root *we- "to blow").

Sense of "express freely" first recorded 1590s. Sense of "divulge, publish" (1590s) is behind phrase vent one's spleen (see spleen). Related: Vented; venting.

Related entries & more