Etymology
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non-event (n.)

1957, "event that never happened;" 1958, "event that happened but fell so far short of expectations it might as well not have happened; unimportant or disappointing event;" from non- + event.

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counterfactual (adj.)

also counter-factual, "expressing a 'what if;' expressing what has not happened but could have," by 1946, from counter- + factual.

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happen (v.)
late 14c., happenen, "to come to pass, occur, come about, be the case," literally "occur by hap, have the (good or bad) fortune (to do, be, etc.);" extension (with verb-formative -n) of the more common hap (v.). Old English used gelimpan, gesceon, and Middle English also had befall. In Middle English fel it hap meant "it happened." Related: Happened; happening. Phrase happens to be as an assertive way to say "is" is from 1707.
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Hadith (n.)
"collected Islamic tradition, the body of traditions relating to Muhammad," 1817, from Arabic, literally "tradition," related to hadith "new, young," hadatha "it happened, occurred," and Hebrew hadash "new." Plural is Hadithat.
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pre-atomic (adj.)

"before the atomic age," 1914, in "World Set Free," in which H.G. Wells anticipates the word the future would use to look back from a time defined by events that hadn't yet happened in his day; from pre- + atomic.

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tricentennial (adj.)

also tri-centennial, "comprising three hundred years; including or relating to an interval of three hundred years," 1818; as a noun, "day observed as a festival in commemoration of something that happened three hundred years before," 1872. See tri- + centennial.

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might (v.)

Old English mihte, meahte, originally the past tense of may (Old English magen "to be able"), thus "*may-ed." The noun might-have-been "something that might have happened but did not," also "someone that might have been greater but wasn't," is by 1848.

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contingency (n.)
Origin and meaning of contingency

1560s, "quality of being contingent, openness to chance or free will, the possibility that that which happens might not have happened," from contingent + abstract noun suffix -cy. Meaning "a chance occurrence, an accident, an event which may or may not occur" is from 1610s.

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hindsight (n.)
1806, "backsight of a firearm," from hind (adj.) + sight (n.). Meaning "a seeing what has happened, a seeing after the event what ought to have been done" is attested by 1862, American English, (in proverbial "If our foresight was as good as our hindsight, it would be an easy matter to get rich"), probably formed as a humorous opposition to older foresight (q.v.).
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caught 

past tense and past participle of catch (v.), attested from 14c., predominant after c. 1800, replacing earlier catched. A rare instance of an English strong verb with a French origin. This might have been by influence of Middle English lacchen (see latch (v.)), which also then meant "to catch" and was more or less a synonym of catch (as their noun forms remain), and which then had past tense forms lahte, lauhte, laught. The influence would have happened before latch switched to its modern weak conjugation.

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