Etymology
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happen (v.)
late 14c., happenen, "to come to pass, occur, come about, be the case," literally "occur by hap, have the (good or bad) fortune (to do, be, etc.);" extension (with verb-formative -n) of the more common hap (v.). Old English used gelimpan, gesceon, and Middle English also had befall. In Middle English fel it hap meant "it happened." Related: Happened; happening. Phrase happens to be as an assertive way to say "is" is from 1707.
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happening (adj.)
1520s, "occurring," present-participle adjective from happen (v.). Compare incident.
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mishappen (v.)

"to happen ill, meet with misfortune, come to grief," mid-14c., from mis- (1) + happen. Related: Mishappened; mishappening. The word now is obsolete. Chaucer uses mishappy; mishappiness was in use 16c.-17c.

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happening (n.)
mid-15c., "chance, luck," verbal noun from happen (v.); meaning "an occurrence" is 1550s. Sense of "spontaneous event or display" is from 1959 in the argot of artists. Happenings "events" was noted by Fowler as a vogue word from c. 1905.
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perhaps (adv.)

"possibly," late 15c., perhappes, with adverbial genitive, from earlier perhap (mid-14c.), from per, par "by, through" (see per) + plural of hap "chance" (see happen), on model of peradventure, perchance, etc. which now have been superseded by this word. Perhappons "possibly, by chance" is recorded from late 15c.

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betide (v.)
late 12c., "to happen, come to pass," from be- + tiden "to happen" (see tide (v.)). Transitive sense "happen to (someone)" is from early 13c. Surviving, if at all, in the expression woe betide! (late 14c.).
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incident (adj.)

late 15c., "likely to happen," from Latin incidentem (nominative incidens), present participle of incidere "to happen, befall" (see incident (n.)). From 1620s as "occurring as a subordinate;" 1660s in literal sense "falling or striking upon."

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bechance (v.)
"to happen, chance," 1520s, from be- + chance (v.). Related: Bechanced; bechancing.
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mayhap (adv.)

"it may happen, perhaps," 1530s, from phrase (it) may hap (q.v.).

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mischance (v.)

"to happen wrongly or unfortunately," 1540s, from mis- (1) + chance (v.). Related: Mischanced; mischancing.

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