Etymology
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hairy (adj.)
early 14c., "covered with hair, rough, shaggy," from hair + -y (2). From 1848 in slang sense of "difficult," perhaps from the notion of "rugged, rough." Farmer calls this "Oxford slang." Related: Hairiness. For adjectives Old English had hæriht, hære "hairy;" hæren "of hair."
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pilose (adj.)

"covered with hair, hairy," 1753, from Latin pilosus "hairy, shaggy, covered with hair," from pilus "hair" (see pile (n.3)). Related: Pilosity (c. 1600).

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pilar (adj.)

"of or pertaining to hair," 1858, from Modern Latin pilaris "hairy," from pilus "hair" (see pile (n.3)).

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mossy (adj.)

early 15c., "like moss, downy, velvety, or hairy;" 1560s, "overgrown with moss," from moss + -y (2).

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hirsute (adj.)
"hairy," 1620s, from Latin hirsutus "rough, shaggy, bristly," figuratively "rude, unpolished," related to hirtus "shaggy," and possibly to horrere "to bristle with fear" (see horror).
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bumble-bee (n.)
also bumblebee, "large, hairy type of bee," 1520s, replacing Middle English humbul-be (altered by association with Middle English bombeln "to boom, buzz," late 14c.), probably originally echoic.
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sasquatch (n.)
1929, from Halkomelem (Salishan), a native language of the Pacific Northwest, sæsq'ec, one of a race of huge, hairy man-monsters supposed to inhabit the Pacific northwest woods in American Indian lore and also known as bigfoot.
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velour (n.)
1706, also velure, velours, from French velours "velvet," from Old French velor, alteration of velos "velvet," from Old Provençal velos, from Latin villosus (adj.) "shaggy, hairy, rough" (in Medieval Latin "velvet"), from villus "shaggy hair, tuft of hair" (see velvet).
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mange (n.)

"skin disease of hairy animals," especially dogs, often caused by mites, c. 1400, manjeue, maniewe, from Old French manjue, mangeue "the itch," also "hunger, appetite; itching, longing," literally "the eating," verbal noun from a collateral form of Old French mangier "to eat" (Modern French manger) "to eat," from Late Latin manducare "to chew, eat," from manducus "glutton," from Latin mandere "to chew" (see mandible).

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poilu (n.)
French private soldier, 1914, from French poilu, literally "hairy," from poil "hair," not of the head, but of beards, animal coats, etc., from Latin pilus (see pile (n.3)). In 19c. French the adjective had a secondary sense of "strong, brave, courageous" (Balzac).
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