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habitual (adj.)
mid-15c., "customary, belonging to one's inherent disposition," from Medieval Latin habitualis "pertaining to habit or dress," from Latin habitus "condition, appearance, dress," originally past participle of habere "to have, hold, possess; wear; find oneself, be situated; consider, think, reason, have in mind; manage, keep," from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive."
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*ghabh- 
also *ghebh-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to give or receive." The basic sense of the root probably is "to hold," which can be either in offering or in taking.

It forms all or part of: able; avoirdupois; binnacle; cohabit; cohabitation; debenture; debit; debt; dishabille; due; duty; endeavor; exhibit; exhibition; forgive; gavel; gift; give; habeas corpus; habiliment; habit; habitable; habitant; habitat; habitation; habitual; habituate; habituation; habitude; habitue; inhabit; inhibit; inhibition; malady; prebend; prohibit; prohibition; provender.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit gabhasti- "hand, forearm;" Latin habere "to have, hold, possess," habitus "condition, demeanor, appearance, dress;" Old Irish gaibim "I take, hold, I have," gabal "act of taking;" Lithuanian gabana "armful," gabenti "to remove;" Gothic gabei "riches;" Old English giefan, Old Norse gefa "to give."
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wont (n.)
"habitual usage, custom," c. 1400, from wont, adjective and verb.
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barfly (n.)
"habitual drunkard," 1910, from bar (n.2) + fly (n.).
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gambling (n.)
1784, "habitual indulgence in gambling," verbal noun from gamble (v.). Gambling-house attested by 1794.
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accustomed (adj.)
late 15c., "made customary, habitual, often practiced or used," past-participle adjective from accustom (v.).
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rummy (n.2)

 "habitual drunkard," by 1851, from rum (n.) + -y (3); the meaning "opponent of temperance" in U.S. politics is from 1860. 

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drinker (n.)

Old English drincere, "one who drinks," agent noun from drink (v.). Specifically of habitual consumers of alcoholic beverages from c. 1200.

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tippler (n.)
late 14c., "seller of alcoholic liquors," of uncertain origin (see tipple). In the sense of "habitual drinker" it dates from 1570s.
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