Etymology
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Hades 

"god of the dead in Greek mythology;" also the name of his realm, the abode of the dead spirits, 1590s, from Greek Haidēs, in Homer the name of the god of the underworld, son of Kronos and Rhea, brother of Zeus and Poseidon. His name is of unknown origin. Perhaps literally "the invisible" [Watkins], from privative prefix a- + idein "to see" (from PIE root *weid- "to see"). The name of the god was extended in later Greek writing to his kingdom, also "the grave, death." Related: Hadal (adj.), 1964; Hadean.

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Hadith (n.)
"collected Islamic tradition, the body of traditions relating to Muhammad," 1817, from Arabic, literally "tradition," related to hadith "new, young," hadatha "it happened, occurred," and Hebrew hadash "new." Plural is Hadithat.
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hadn't 
by 1705, contraction of had not.
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hadron (n.)
1962, from Greek hadros "thick, bulky" (the primary sense), also "strong, great; large, well-grown, ripe," from PIE root *sa- "to satisfy." With elementary particle suffix -on. Coined in Russian as adron.
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hadrosaur (n.)
1865, from Modern Latin hadrosaurus (1859), from Greek hadros "thick, stout" (see hadron) + -saurus.
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hadst 
archaic second person singular of had; a contraction of haddest.
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hae (v.)
an attempt to represent the Scottish pronunciation of have.
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