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42 entries found
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guilty (adj.)
Old English gyltig "offending, delinquent, criminal," from gylt (see guilt (n.)). In law, "that has committed some specified offense," late 13c. Of conscience, feelings, etc., 1590s. Meaning "person who is guilty" is from 1540s. To plead not guilty is from 15c.; to plead guilty is 19c., though, as OED notes, "Guilty is technically not a plea, but a confession." Related: Guiltily; guiltiness.
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rapist (n.)

"one guilty of sexual assault," 1883, agent noun from rape (v.).

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bigamous (adj.)
"pertaining to or guilty of bigamy," 1690s; see bigamy + -ous.
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served (adj.)
"found guilty, convicted; ordered to be punished or transported; beaten," 1811, slang past-participle adjective from serve (v.).
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mens rea 

"state of mind accompanying an act which condemns the perpetrator to criminal punishment," Latin, literally "guilty mind;" from mens "mind," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think."

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blood-stained (adj.)
"stained with blood; guilty of slaughter," 1590s, from blood (n.) + past participle of stain (v.).
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convict (n.)

late 15c., "person proved or found guilty of an alleged offence," from obsolete adjective convict "convicted," from Latin convictus (see convict (v.)). Slang shortening con is from 1893.

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felo-de-se (n.)
in old law use, "one who commits the felony of suicide," whether deliberately or in maliciously attempting to kill another, Latin, literally "one guilty concerning himself." See felon.
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traitorous (adj.)
late 14c., "guilty of treason," apparently from Old French traitros "treacherous" (13c.), from traitor (see traitor). Related: Traitorously; traitorousness.
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