Etymology
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guide (v.)
late 14c., "to lead, direct, conduct," from Old French guider "to guide, lead, conduct" (14c.), earlier guier, from Frankish *witan "show the way" or a similar Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *witanan "to look after, guard, ascribe to, reproach" (source also of German weisen "to show, point out," Old English witan "to reproach," wite "fine, penalty"), from PIE root *weid- "to see." The form of the French word influenced by Old Provençal guidar (n.) "guide, leader," or Italian guidare, both from the same source. Related: Guided; guiding. Guided missile, one capable of altering course in flight, is from 1945.
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guide (n.)
mid-14c., "one who shows the way," from Old French guide, 14c., verbal noun from guider (see guide (v.)). In book titles from 1610s; meaning "book of information on local sites" is from 1759. In 18c. France, a "for Dummies" or "Idiot's Guide to" book would have been a guid' âne, literally "guide-ass." Guide-dog for the blind is from 1932.
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guide-post (n.)
also guidepost, 1761, from guide (v.) + post (n.1). Placed at a fork or intersection, with signs to guide travelers on their way.
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unguided (adj.)
1580s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of guide (v.).
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guideline (n.)
1785, "line marked on a surface before cutting," from guide + line (n.). Meaning "rope for steering a hot-air balloon" is from 1846. In figurative use by 1948. Related: Guidelines.
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guidance (n.)
1530s, "the process of directing conduct," hybrid from guide (v.) + -ance; replacing 15c. guying. In reference to direction in school, career, marriage, etc., from 1927.
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misguide (v.)

late 14c., "to go astray, direct (oneself) badly," from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + guide (v.). Transitive sense of "to guide in the wrong direction, lead astray in action or thought" is attested by c. 1500. Related: Misguided; misguiding.

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guidon (n.)

"small flag," originally one borne by a military unit to direct movements, 1540s, from French guidon (16c.), from Italian guidone "battle standard," from guidare "to direct, guide," from Old Provençal guidar "to guide," from Proto-Germanic *witanan "to look after, guard" (from PIE root *weid- "to see"). Compare guide (v.).

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psychopomp (n.)

"guide or conductor of spirits or souls to the other world," 1835, from Greek psykhopompos "spirit-guide," a term applied to Charon, Hermes Trismegistos, Apollo, etc.; from psykhē "the soul, mind, spirit" (see psyche) + pompos "guide, conductor, escort, messenger," from pempein "to send, dispatch, guide, accompany," which is of unknown origin. "The verb has no IE etymology, nor does it show characteristics of loanwords or Pre-Greek vocabulary" [Beekes].

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shepherd (v.)
1790, "to herd sheep," from shepherd (n.). The metaphoric sense of "watch over or guide" is first recorded 1820. Related: Shepherded; shepherding.
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