Etymology
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guest (v.)

early 14c., "receive as a guest;" 1610s, "be a guest;" 1936, American English, "appear as a guest performer," from guest (n.). Related: Guested; guesting.

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worker (n.)

mid-14c., "laborer, toiler, performer, doer," agent noun from work (v.). As a type of bee, 1747. As "one employed for a wage," 1848. Old English had wyrcend "worker, laborer."

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guest (n.)

Old English gæst, giest (Anglian gest) "an accidental guest, a chance comer, a stranger," from Proto-Germanic *gastiz (source also of Old Frisian jest, Dutch gast, German Gast, Gothic gasts "guest," originally "stranger"), from PIE root *ghos-ti- "stranger, guest, host" (source also of Latin hostis, in earlier use "a stranger," in classical use "an enemy"); the root sense, according to Watkins, probably is "someone with whom one has reciprocal duties of hospitality."

Spelling evolution influenced by Old Norse cognate gestr (the usual sound changes from the Old English word would have yielded Modern English *yest). Meaning "person entertained for pay" (at an inn, etc.) is from late 13c. Old English also had cuma "stranger, guest," literally "a comer." Phrase be my guest in the sense of "go right ahead" first recorded 1955.

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wonder-worker (n.)

1590s, from wonder (n.) + worker, translating Greek thaumatourgos. Old English had wundorweorc "miracle."

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guest-room (n.)

also guestroom, 1630s, from guest (n.) + room (n.). Guest chamber is recorded from 1520s. Old English had giestærn "guest-chamber," with the second element the same one as in barn.

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co-worker (n.)

also coworker, "one who works with another," 1640s, from co- + worker (n.). The verb co-work is attested from 1610s.

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guest star (n.)

1914 in the entertainment sense; earlier the phrase was used literally, of novae. As a verb, by 1942.

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Xenia 

city in Ohio, from Greek xenia "hospitality, rights of a guest, friendly relation with strangers," literally "state of a guest," from xenos "guest" (from PIE root *ghos-ti- "stranger, guest, host"). Founded 1803 and named by vote of a town meeting, on suggestion of the Rev. Robert Armstrong to imply friendliness and hospitality.

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convival (adj.)

1640s, from Latin convivalis "pertaining to a feast or guest," from conviva "a feaster, guest," from convivere (see convivial). It has been replaced in most uses by convivial, which means the same.

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xeno- 

before vowels, xen-, word-forming element meaning "strange, foreign; stranger, foreigner," from Greek xenos "a guest, stranger, foreigner, refugee, guest-friend, one entitled to hospitality," cognate with Latin hostis, from PIE root *ghos-ti- "stranger, guest, host." "The term was politely used of any one whose name was unknown" [Liddell & Scott].

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