Etymology
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grounds (n.)
"residue at the bottom of a liquid," mid-14c., perhaps from past tense of grind (v.). Other senses, such as "enclosed portion of land" (mid-15c.) are from ground (n.).
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premises (n.)
"building and grounds," 1730; see premise (n.).
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Lord's 
cricket grounds in London, named for founder Thomas Lord (1757-1832).
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actionable (adj.)
"furnishing sufficient grounds for a (legal) action," 1590s; from action + -able. Related: Actionably.
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rotter (n.)

"person deemed objectionable on moral grounds," 1889, slang, from rot (v.) + -er (3).

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raison d'etre (n.)

"excuse for being," 1864, first recorded in letter of J.S. Mill, from French raison d'être, literally "rational grounds for existence."

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hopeless (adj.)
1560s, "offering no grounds for hope," from hope (n.) + -less. From 1580s as "having no expectation of success." Related: Hopelessly; hopelessness.
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afforest (v.)
"convert to forest" (especially for hunting grounds), c. 1500, from Anglo-Latin afforestare, from assimilated form of Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + Medieval Latin forestis (see forest (n.)). Related: Afforestation.
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hopefully (adv.)
1630s, "in a hopeful manner, with grounds of expectation for success," from hopeful + -ly (2). As a replacement for the admittedly awkward it is to be hoped that, attested from 1932 but avoided by careful writers.
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buggy (n.)

"light carriage with four wheels and seats for two," 1773, of unknown origin. OED finds no grounds for derivation from Hindi bagghi "a gig" or another Anglo-Indian source. Extended to baby carriages by 1884.

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