Etymology
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curriculum vitae (n.)

"brief account of one's life and work," 1902, Latin, literally "course of one's life" (see curriculum + vital). Abbreviated c.v.

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infra dig. 
"beneath one's dignity, unbecoming to one's position in society," 1824, colloquial abbreviation of Latin infra dignitatem "beneath the dignity of." See infra- + dignity.
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sui generis 
1787, Latin, literally "of one's own kind, peculiar." First element from sui, genitive of suus "his, her, its, one's," from Old Latin sovos, from PIE root *swe-, pronoun of the third person (see idiom).
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non compos mentis 

c. 1600, in law, "not capable, mentally, of managing one's own affairs," Latin, "not master of one's mind," from non "not" + compos "having power" (from com- "together" + potis "powerful") + mentis "of the mind," genitive of mens "mind."

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ball and chain (n.)

a type of prisoner's restraint, 1818; used figuratively by 1883 of foolish, wasteful habits; as "one's wife," 1920.

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faux pas (n.)
"breach of good manners, any act that compromises one's reputation," 1670s, French, literally "false step." See false and pace (n.).
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ex officio 
Latin, "in discharge of one's duties," literally "out of duty," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + officio, ablative of officium "duty" (see office).
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jerk off (v.)

slang, "perform male masturbation," by 1896, from jerk (v.) denoting rapid pulling motion + off (adv.). Compare come off "experience orgasm" (17c.). Farmer and Henley ("Slang and Its Analogues") also lists as synonyms jerk (one's) jelly and jerk (one's) juice. The noun jerk off or jerkoff as an emphatic form of jerk (n.2) is attested by 1968. As an adjective from 1957.

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compos mentis (adj.)

Latin, literally "in command of one's mind," from compos "having the mastery of," from com "with, together" (see com-) + stem of potis "powerful, master" (from PIE root *poti- "powerful; lord"), + mentis, genitive of mens "mind" (from PIE root *men- (1) "to think").

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blind spot (n.)
1864, "spot within one's range of vision but where one cannot see," from blind (adj.) + spot (n.). Of the point on the retina insensitive to light (where the optic nerve enters the eye), from 1872. Figurative sense (of moral, intellectual, etc. sight) by 1907.
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